Effects of Green Light on Elongation Do Not Interact with Far-Red, Unless the Phytochrome Photostationary State (PSS) Changes in Tomato

Xue Zhang, Ep Heuvelink, Michaela Melegkou, Xin Yuan, Weijie Jiang*, Leo F.M. Marcelis*

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleAcademicpeer-review

8 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Green light (G) could trigger a “shade avoidance syndrome” (SAS) similarly to far-red light. We aimed to test the hypothesis that G interacts with far-red light to induce SAS, with this interaction mediated by phytochromes (phys). The tomato (Solanum lycopersicum cv. Moneymaker) wild-type (WT) and phyA, phyB1B2, and phyAB1B2 mutants were grown in a climate room with or without 30 µmol m−2 s−1 G on red/blue and red/blue/far-red backgrounds, maintaining the same photosynthetically active radiation (400–700 nm) of 150 µmol m−2 s−1 and red/blue ratio of 3. G hardly affected the dry mass accumulation or leaf area of WT, phyA, and phyB1B2 with or without far-red light. A lower phytochrome photostationary state (PSS) by adding far-red light significantly increased the total dry mass by enhancing the leaf area in WT plants but not in phy mutants. When the background light did not contain far-red light, partially replacing red/blue with G did not significantly affect stem elongation. However, when the background light contained far-red light, partially replacing red/blue with G enhanced elongation only when associated with a decrease in PSS, indicating that G interacts with far-red light on elongation only when the PSS changes

Original languageEnglish
Article number151
JournalBiology
Volume11
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jan 2022

Keywords

  • Light spectrum
  • Photoreceptor
  • Shade avoidance
  • Solanum lycopersicum

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