Effects of flooding on germination, establishment and survival of woody species; a field and modeling study on the floodplains of the river Rhine

K. Kramer, B.S.J. Nijhof, S.J. Vreugdenhil, D.C. van der Werf, I.J.J. van den Wyngaert, J. Armbruster, V. Späth, D. Siepmann-Schinker

Research output: Book/ReportReportAcademic

Abstract

Climate change results in higher water levels and therefore more frequent flooding and longer inundation of the floodplains of the river Rhine. Retention basins are installed in Germany and anticipated in the Netherlands to reduce peak flows and to prevent loss of property. In Germany, many of the retention basins are covered with forests that have experienced few floodings and that may be severely damaged by an extensive flood. In the Netherlands, the allocation of retention basins provides opportunities for new forest development. In both cases, knowledge is required on the effects of flooding on germination, establishment and survival of woody species to support the selection of retention basins. We analyzed the effects of flooding regimes on germination, establishment and survival of both saplings and adult trees, using analyzing available data; by collecting observational data; by performing field experiments; and by integrating this knowledge in a simulation model. We found clear differences between species in their response to flooding characteristics. The model is available for future studies on selection of retention basins
Original languageEnglish
Place of PublicationWageningen
PublisherAlterra
Number of pages72
Publication statusPublished - 2006

Publication series

NameAlterra-rapport
PublisherAlterra
No.1345
ISSN (Print)1566-7197

Keywords

  • flooding
  • germination
  • establishment
  • survival
  • riparian forests
  • floodplains
  • water storage
  • flood control
  • woody plants
  • netherlands
  • germany
  • trees
  • river rhine

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