Effects of exercise on l-carnitine and lipid metabolism in African catfish (Clarias gariepinus) fed different dietary l-carnitine and lipid levels

R.O.A. Ozorio, V.J.T. van Ginneken, R.J.B. Bessa, M.W.A. Verstegen, J.A.J. Verreth, E.A. Huisman

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleAcademicpeer-review

11 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

African catfish (Clarias gariepinus) were fed four isonitrogenous diets (34 % crude protein), each containing one of two lipid (100 or 180 g/kg) and two l-carnitine (15 or 1000 mg/kg) levels. After 81 d of feeding, thirty-two fish (body weight 32 g) from each dietary group were randomly selected, sixteen fish were induced to a 3-h swim (speed of 1.5 body length (BL)/s), while the other sixteen fish were kept under resting condition. Fish fed 1000 mg l-carnitine accumulated 3.5 and 5 times more l-carnitine in plasma and muscle, respectively, than fish fed the 15 mg l-carnitine. Muscle l-carnitine content was significantly lower in exercised fish than in rested fish. High dietary lipid level (fish oil) led to an increase in muscle n-3 PUFA content and a decrease in SFA and MUFA content. In liver, the increase in dietary lipid level resulted in an increased levels of both n-6 and n-3 PUFA. l-carnitine supplementation significantly decreased n-3 PUFA content. Exercise decreased n-3 PUFA in both muscle and liver. Plasma lactate and lactate dehydrogenase, normally associated with increased glycolytic processes, were positively correlated with exercise and inversely correlated with dietary l-carnitine level. l-carnitine supplementation reduced significantly the RQ from 0.72 to 0.63, and an interaction between dietary l-carnitine and lipid was observed (P <0.03). Our results indicate that an increase in fatty acids (FA) intake may promote FA oxidation, and both carnitine and exercise might influence the regulation of FA oxidation selectivity.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1139-1150
JournalBritish Journal of Nutrition
Volume103
Issue number8
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2010

Keywords

  • trout oncorhynchus-mykiss
  • bream pagrus-major
  • high-fat diets
  • salmo-salar l
  • rainbow-trout
  • growth-performance
  • exhaustive exercise
  • nutritional supplements
  • intermediary metabolism
  • swimming performance

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