Effects of different sexual stimuli on oxytoxin release, uterine activity and receptive behavior in estrous sows

P. Langendijk, E.G. Bouwman, D. Schams, N.M. Soede, B. Kemp

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleAcademicpeer-review

44 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

This study was designed to assess effects of exogenous oxytocin (OT) on uterine activity, and to compare three different sexual stimuli in their effects on OT release, uterine activity and receptive behavior in estrous sows. Uterine activity was recorded nonsurgically, by transcervical insertion of an open-end catheter into the caudal part of the uterine lumen. After recording spontaneous uterine activity, exogenous OT was administered (Experiment 1), or one of the following stimuli was applied to the sow (Experiment 2): tactile stimuli, i.e. manual stimulation of the sow's back and flanks, tactile stimulation in combination with boar pheromone spray (5alpha-androstenon), or tactile stimuli in the presence of a boar. Both exogenous OT and endogenously released OT increased uterine activity. The effect depended on the uterine activity before treatment, with the effect being greater in those sows with lower uterine activity before treatment. In Experiment 2, boar presence was the only stimulus that elicited a clear, surge-like release of OT, and also clearly increased uterine activity. Release of OT was not necessary for induction of receptive behavior: tactile stimulation alone and in combination with pheromone spray elicited a standing response in one third of the sows, but had no effect on OT release. (C) 2002 Elsevier Science Inc. All rights reserved.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)849-861
JournalTheriogenology
Volume59
Issue number3-4
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2003

Keywords

  • boar contact
  • weaned sows
  • expression
  • estrus
  • pig
  • radioimmunoassay
  • insemination
  • steroids
  • cattle

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