Effects of dietary fibers with different fermentation characteristics on feeding motivation in adult female pigs

C. Souza Da Silva, J.E. Bolhuis, W.J.J. Gerrits, B. Kemp, J.J.G.C. van den Borne

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleAcademicpeer-review

19 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Dietary fibers can be fermented in the colon, resulting in production of short-chain fatty acids (SCFA) and secretion of satiety-related peptides. Fermentation characteristics (fermentation kinetics and SCFA-profile) differ between fibers and could impact their satiating potential. We investigated the effects of fibers with varying fermentation characteristics on feeding motivation in adult female pigs. Sixteen pair-housed pigs received four diets in four periods in a Latin square design. Starch from a control (C) diet was exchanged, based on gross energy, for inulin (INU), guar gum (GG), or retrograded tapioca starch (RS), each at a low (L) and a high (H) inclusion level. This resulted in a decreased metabolizable energy intake when feeding fiber diets as compared with the C diet. According to in vitro fermentation measurements, INU is rapidly fermentable and yields relatively high amounts of propionate, GG is moderately rapidly fermentable and yields relatively high amounts of acetate, and RS is slowly fermentable and yields relatively high amounts of butyrate. Feeding motivation was assessed using behavioral tests at 1 h, 3 h and 7 h after the morning meal, and home pen behavioral observations throughout the day. The number of wheel turns paid for a food reward in an operant test was unaffected by diet. Pigs on H-diets ran 25% slower for a food reward in a runway test than pigs on L-diets, and showed less spontaneous physical activity and less stereotypic behavior in the hours before the afternoon meal, reflecting increased interprandial satiety. Reduced feeding motivation with increasing inclusion level was most pronounced for RS, as pigs decreased speed in the runway test and tended to have a lower voluntary food intake in an ad libitum food intake test when fed RS-H. In conclusion, increasing levels of fermentable fibers in the diet seemed to enhance satiety in adult pigs, despite a reduction in metabolizable energy supply. RS was the most satiating fiber, possibly due to its slow rate of fermentation and high production of butyrate
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)148-157
JournalPhysiology and Behavior
Volume110-111
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2013

Keywords

  • chain fatty-acids
  • glucagon-like peptide-1
  • resistant starch
  • growing pigs
  • appetite regulation
  • guar gum
  • gastrointestinal peptides
  • nonstarch polysaccharides
  • hindgut fermentation
  • weight regulation

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