Effectiveness of iron sludge and fulvic acid for prevention of iron chlorosis in soybean

Research output: Book/ReportReportProfessional

Abstract

Drinking water company Vitens produces iron sludge and fulvic acid as by-products of their drinking water production process. This study investigated the effectiveness of iron sludge as a source of iron for soybean. A pot experiment was performed with a soybean variety that is susceptible for Fe chlorosis, grown on a clay soil from Tricht (Netherlands) and a calcareous soil from Canaveralejo (Spain). In the Tricht soil, no symptoms of iron chlorosis were observed in any treatment. In the Canaveralejo soil, soybean suffered from iron chlorosis, and iron sludge, with or without fulvic acid, reduced symptoms of iron chlorosis and yield loss as compared to the control treatment. However, iron sludge was not as effective as Fe-HBED since this treatment gave an even higher yield and showed no symptoms of iron chlorosis during the course of the experiment.
Original languageEnglish
Place of PublicationWageningen
PublisherWageningen Environmental Research
Number of pages41
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2019

Publication series

NameWageningen Environmental Research report
No.2971
ISSN (Print)1566-7197

Fingerprint

fulvic acid
soybean
sludge
iron
drinking water
chlorosis
calcareous soil
clay soil
soil
experiment

Cite this

Regelink, I., Rietra, R., & Comans, R. (2019). Effectiveness of iron sludge and fulvic acid for prevention of iron chlorosis in soybean. (Wageningen Environmental Research report; No. 2971). Wageningen: Wageningen Environmental Research. https://doi.org/10.18174/503765
Regelink, Inge ; Rietra, René ; Comans, Rob. / Effectiveness of iron sludge and fulvic acid for prevention of iron chlorosis in soybean. Wageningen : Wageningen Environmental Research, 2019. 41 p. (Wageningen Environmental Research report; 2971).
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abstract = "Drinking water company Vitens produces iron sludge and fulvic acid as by-products of their drinking water production process. This study investigated the effectiveness of iron sludge as a source of iron for soybean. A pot experiment was performed with a soybean variety that is susceptible for Fe chlorosis, grown on a clay soil from Tricht (Netherlands) and a calcareous soil from Canaveralejo (Spain). In the Tricht soil, no symptoms of iron chlorosis were observed in any treatment. In the Canaveralejo soil, soybean suffered from iron chlorosis, and iron sludge, with or without fulvic acid, reduced symptoms of iron chlorosis and yield loss as compared to the control treatment. However, iron sludge was not as effective as Fe-HBED since this treatment gave an even higher yield and showed no symptoms of iron chlorosis during the course of the experiment.",
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Regelink, I, Rietra, R & Comans, R 2019, Effectiveness of iron sludge and fulvic acid for prevention of iron chlorosis in soybean. Wageningen Environmental Research report, no. 2971, Wageningen Environmental Research, Wageningen. https://doi.org/10.18174/503765

Effectiveness of iron sludge and fulvic acid for prevention of iron chlorosis in soybean. / Regelink, Inge; Rietra, René; Comans, Rob.

Wageningen : Wageningen Environmental Research, 2019. 41 p. (Wageningen Environmental Research report; No. 2971).

Research output: Book/ReportReportProfessional

TY - BOOK

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N2 - Drinking water company Vitens produces iron sludge and fulvic acid as by-products of their drinking water production process. This study investigated the effectiveness of iron sludge as a source of iron for soybean. A pot experiment was performed with a soybean variety that is susceptible for Fe chlorosis, grown on a clay soil from Tricht (Netherlands) and a calcareous soil from Canaveralejo (Spain). In the Tricht soil, no symptoms of iron chlorosis were observed in any treatment. In the Canaveralejo soil, soybean suffered from iron chlorosis, and iron sludge, with or without fulvic acid, reduced symptoms of iron chlorosis and yield loss as compared to the control treatment. However, iron sludge was not as effective as Fe-HBED since this treatment gave an even higher yield and showed no symptoms of iron chlorosis during the course of the experiment.

AB - Drinking water company Vitens produces iron sludge and fulvic acid as by-products of their drinking water production process. This study investigated the effectiveness of iron sludge as a source of iron for soybean. A pot experiment was performed with a soybean variety that is susceptible for Fe chlorosis, grown on a clay soil from Tricht (Netherlands) and a calcareous soil from Canaveralejo (Spain). In the Tricht soil, no symptoms of iron chlorosis were observed in any treatment. In the Canaveralejo soil, soybean suffered from iron chlorosis, and iron sludge, with or without fulvic acid, reduced symptoms of iron chlorosis and yield loss as compared to the control treatment. However, iron sludge was not as effective as Fe-HBED since this treatment gave an even higher yield and showed no symptoms of iron chlorosis during the course of the experiment.

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Regelink I, Rietra R, Comans R. Effectiveness of iron sludge and fulvic acid for prevention of iron chlorosis in soybean. Wageningen: Wageningen Environmental Research, 2019. 41 p. (Wageningen Environmental Research report; 2971). https://doi.org/10.18174/503765