Effect of silage characteristics on enteric methane emission from ruminants

Sanne van Gastelen*, André Bannink, Jan Dijkstra

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleAcademicpeer-review

Abstract

This review evaluates the effects of silage characteristics on enteric methane (CH4) emission from ruminants by performing a meta-analysis. A total of 17 studies were selected from the literature, and the relationship between CH4 yield (g/kg dry matter [DM] intake) and silage characteristics was determined using a mixed model univariate regression procedure. For grass silage, organic matter digestibility (%; R2 = 0.74) and crude protein content (g/kg DM; R2 = 0.36) were negatively associated, and neutral detergent fibre (NDF) content (g/kg DM; R2 = 0.44) was positively associated with CH4 yield. This indicates that increased grass silage quality consistently decreases CH4 yield and may be an effective enteric CH4 mitigation strategy. Similarly, optimizing maize silage quality appears to be an effective enteric CH4 mitigation strategy, because NDF content (g/kg DM; R2 = 0.60) was positively associated with CH4 yield. Upon replacing grass silage with maize silage, dietary starch content (g/kg DM; R2 = 0.62) and silage replacement level (%; R2 = 0.33) were negatively associated, and NDF content (g/kg DM; R2 = 0.34) was positively associated with CH4 yield. These results indicate that replacing grass silage with maize silage consistently decreases CH4 yield and may be an effective enteric CH4 mitigation strategy. In contrast, replacement of alfalfa silage with maize silage was not associated with CH4 yield and does not appear to be an effective strategy to decrease CH4 yield. In conclusion, management practices to improve silage quality are a potent mitigation strategy to reduce enteric CH4 emission per unit of feed fed to ruminants, and implications of silage quality have to be addressed when assessing greenhouse gas emissions in ruminant production.

Original languageEnglish
Article number051
JournalCAB Reviews: Perspectives in Agriculture, Veterinary Science, Nutrition and Natural Resources
Volume14
Issue number51
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 30 Oct 2019

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Silage
silage
ruminant
Methane
Ruminants
methane
ruminants
dry matter
grass silage
corn silage
Poaceae
Zea mays
fiber content
mitigation
detergent
neutral detergent fiber
maize
grass
Detergents
effect

Keywords

  • Enteric methane production
  • Grass silage quality
  • Maize silage quality
  • Mitigation
  • Ruminants
  • Silage replacement

Cite this

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title = "Effect of silage characteristics on enteric methane emission from ruminants",
abstract = "This review evaluates the effects of silage characteristics on enteric methane (CH4) emission from ruminants by performing a meta-analysis. A total of 17 studies were selected from the literature, and the relationship between CH4 yield (g/kg dry matter [DM] intake) and silage characteristics was determined using a mixed model univariate regression procedure. For grass silage, organic matter digestibility ({\%}; R2 = 0.74) and crude protein content (g/kg DM; R2 = 0.36) were negatively associated, and neutral detergent fibre (NDF) content (g/kg DM; R2 = 0.44) was positively associated with CH4 yield. This indicates that increased grass silage quality consistently decreases CH4 yield and may be an effective enteric CH4 mitigation strategy. Similarly, optimizing maize silage quality appears to be an effective enteric CH4 mitigation strategy, because NDF content (g/kg DM; R2 = 0.60) was positively associated with CH4 yield. Upon replacing grass silage with maize silage, dietary starch content (g/kg DM; R2 = 0.62) and silage replacement level ({\%}; R2 = 0.33) were negatively associated, and NDF content (g/kg DM; R2 = 0.34) was positively associated with CH4 yield. These results indicate that replacing grass silage with maize silage consistently decreases CH4 yield and may be an effective enteric CH4 mitigation strategy. In contrast, replacement of alfalfa silage with maize silage was not associated with CH4 yield and does not appear to be an effective strategy to decrease CH4 yield. In conclusion, management practices to improve silage quality are a potent mitigation strategy to reduce enteric CH4 emission per unit of feed fed to ruminants, and implications of silage quality have to be addressed when assessing greenhouse gas emissions in ruminant production.",
keywords = "Enteric methane production, Grass silage quality, Maize silage quality, Mitigation, Ruminants, Silage replacement",
author = "{van Gastelen}, Sanne and Andr{\'e} Bannink and Jan Dijkstra",
year = "2019",
month = "10",
day = "30",
doi = "10.1079/PAVSNNR201914051",
language = "English",
volume = "14",
journal = "CAB Reviews: Perspectives in Agriculture, Veterinary Science, Nutrition and Natural Resources",
issn = "1749-8848",
publisher = "CAB International",
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}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Effect of silage characteristics on enteric methane emission from ruminants

AU - van Gastelen, Sanne

AU - Bannink, André

AU - Dijkstra, Jan

PY - 2019/10/30

Y1 - 2019/10/30

N2 - This review evaluates the effects of silage characteristics on enteric methane (CH4) emission from ruminants by performing a meta-analysis. A total of 17 studies were selected from the literature, and the relationship between CH4 yield (g/kg dry matter [DM] intake) and silage characteristics was determined using a mixed model univariate regression procedure. For grass silage, organic matter digestibility (%; R2 = 0.74) and crude protein content (g/kg DM; R2 = 0.36) were negatively associated, and neutral detergent fibre (NDF) content (g/kg DM; R2 = 0.44) was positively associated with CH4 yield. This indicates that increased grass silage quality consistently decreases CH4 yield and may be an effective enteric CH4 mitigation strategy. Similarly, optimizing maize silage quality appears to be an effective enteric CH4 mitigation strategy, because NDF content (g/kg DM; R2 = 0.60) was positively associated with CH4 yield. Upon replacing grass silage with maize silage, dietary starch content (g/kg DM; R2 = 0.62) and silage replacement level (%; R2 = 0.33) were negatively associated, and NDF content (g/kg DM; R2 = 0.34) was positively associated with CH4 yield. These results indicate that replacing grass silage with maize silage consistently decreases CH4 yield and may be an effective enteric CH4 mitigation strategy. In contrast, replacement of alfalfa silage with maize silage was not associated with CH4 yield and does not appear to be an effective strategy to decrease CH4 yield. In conclusion, management practices to improve silage quality are a potent mitigation strategy to reduce enteric CH4 emission per unit of feed fed to ruminants, and implications of silage quality have to be addressed when assessing greenhouse gas emissions in ruminant production.

AB - This review evaluates the effects of silage characteristics on enteric methane (CH4) emission from ruminants by performing a meta-analysis. A total of 17 studies were selected from the literature, and the relationship between CH4 yield (g/kg dry matter [DM] intake) and silage characteristics was determined using a mixed model univariate regression procedure. For grass silage, organic matter digestibility (%; R2 = 0.74) and crude protein content (g/kg DM; R2 = 0.36) were negatively associated, and neutral detergent fibre (NDF) content (g/kg DM; R2 = 0.44) was positively associated with CH4 yield. This indicates that increased grass silage quality consistently decreases CH4 yield and may be an effective enteric CH4 mitigation strategy. Similarly, optimizing maize silage quality appears to be an effective enteric CH4 mitigation strategy, because NDF content (g/kg DM; R2 = 0.60) was positively associated with CH4 yield. Upon replacing grass silage with maize silage, dietary starch content (g/kg DM; R2 = 0.62) and silage replacement level (%; R2 = 0.33) were negatively associated, and NDF content (g/kg DM; R2 = 0.34) was positively associated with CH4 yield. These results indicate that replacing grass silage with maize silage consistently decreases CH4 yield and may be an effective enteric CH4 mitigation strategy. In contrast, replacement of alfalfa silage with maize silage was not associated with CH4 yield and does not appear to be an effective strategy to decrease CH4 yield. In conclusion, management practices to improve silage quality are a potent mitigation strategy to reduce enteric CH4 emission per unit of feed fed to ruminants, and implications of silage quality have to be addressed when assessing greenhouse gas emissions in ruminant production.

KW - Enteric methane production

KW - Grass silage quality

KW - Maize silage quality

KW - Mitigation

KW - Ruminants

KW - Silage replacement

U2 - 10.1079/PAVSNNR201914051

DO - 10.1079/PAVSNNR201914051

M3 - Article

VL - 14

JO - CAB Reviews: Perspectives in Agriculture, Veterinary Science, Nutrition and Natural Resources

JF - CAB Reviews: Perspectives in Agriculture, Veterinary Science, Nutrition and Natural Resources

SN - 1749-8848

IS - 51

M1 - 051

ER -