Effect of salt intensity in soup on ad libitum intake and on subsequent food choice

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35 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The effect of salt intensity on ad libitum intake of tomato soup was investigated when soup was served as a first course and as a second course. Also the effect of salt intensity in soup on subsequent sweet vs. savory choice of sandwich fillings was investigated. Forty-three healthy subjects consumed ad libitum a low-salt (LS), ideal-salt (IS) and high-salt (HS) tomato soup in both meal settings. The salt concentrations were selected on an individual basis, in a way that IS was most pleasant and LS and HS were similar in pleasantness. The ad libitum intake of IS soup was higher than that of LS and HS soup, and the ad libitum intake of LS soup was higher than that of HS soup. The meal setting, soup as a first or as a second course, did not affect ad libitum intake. Salt intensity in soup did not predict sweet vs. savory choice of fillings in grams or energy, although most sodium from fillings was consumed after intake of HS soup. In conclusion, a higher salt intensity lead to lower ad libitum intake of soup similar in palatability (LS vs. HS). In addition, salt intensity in soup does not predict sweet vs. savory food choice.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)48-55
JournalAppetite
Volume58
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2012

Keywords

  • sensory-specific satiety
  • free-living humans
  • energy density
  • bite size
  • palatability
  • meal
  • satiation
  • consumption
  • viscosity
  • appetite

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