Effect of resistant starch on net portal-drained viscera flux of glucose, volatile fatty acids, urea, and ammonia in growing pigs

J. van der Meulen, G.C.M. Bakker, J.G.M. Bakker, H. de Visser, A.W. Jongbloed, H. Everts

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    Abstract

    Net portal-drained viscera (PDV) flux of glucose, VFA, ammonia, and urea was determined in pigs fed diets with or without resistant starch. Diets consisted of 65% cornstarch (diet CS), 32.5% cornstarch and 32.5% raw potato starch (diet CPS), or 65% raw potato starch (diet PS); the remaining 35% supplied all amino acids, fat, fiber, minerals, and vitamins. The diets contained twice the maintenance requirement for energy and were fed twice daily to four barrows (initial BW 56 kg) in three periods in a crossover design. The pigs were fitted with catheters in a mesenteric vein, a mesenteric-artery, and the portal vein, and net PDV flux was calculated by multiplying portal-arterial concentration differences and corresponding portal vein flow. Net PDV flux of glucose was significantly less after feeding diets CPS and PS, and portal absorption of ileally digested glucose was 89, 66, and 41% for diets CS, CPS, and PS, respectively. Net PDV flux of VFA was lowest after feeding diet CS and three to four times higher after feeding diets CPS and PS. Net PDV flux of ammonia was highest for diet CS and almost halved after feeding diets CPS and PS. There was a small negative net PDV flux of urea for diets CS and CPS, which significantly increased after feeding diet PS. These results suggest that excretion of nitrogen is shifted from urine to feces primarily by reduction of the net PDV flux of ammonia when resistant starch is fed.
    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)2697-2704
    JournalJournal of Animal Science
    Volume75
    Issue number10
    Publication statusPublished - 1997

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