Effect of nitrogen availability on dry matter production, nitrogen uptake and light interception of Brussels sprouts and leeks

R. Booij, A.D.H. Kreuzer, A.L. Smit, A. van der Werf

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticleAcademicpeer-review

    40 Citations (Scopus)

    Abstract

    In field experiments with Brussels sprouts (cv. Kundry) and leeks (cv. Arcona) on a sandy soil, DM production and N uptake during crop growth were studied at different N application rates. N fertilizer application rate affected DM production, leaf area expansion and N uptake more strongly in Brussels sprouts than in leeks. When all N was applied before transplanting, Brussels sprouts showed a higher recovery of N fertilizer than leeks. This was explained by a higher rate of DM production in Brussels sprouts, a consequence of faster leaf area expansion. Late N application, whether as a part of a split application or not, increased N uptake more than DM production, so that tissue N concentrations increased. The relationship between N uptake and DM production depended on N availability and crop growth stage, and if all N was applied before transplanting, the relationship could be described by an asymptotic function. Plant plasticity allowed 'luxury consumption' of N to take place when availability was ample and 'dilution' of N when shortages developed during later growth stages. This implied an increasing tissue N concentration with increasing N application and a decreasing N concentration with increasing age. To achieve near-maximum DM production at any time, tissue N concentration should be kept at 2.8-3.1% DW during the whole growing period for Brussels sprouts as well as for leeks. However, in Brussels sprouts a minimum concentration of 1.2-1.5% DW still allowed growth. In both crops N uptake increased linearly with LAI until maximum leaf area (LAI = 4-5) was reached and this relationship was not affected by N application rate or by experimental year. Irrespective of N application rate or species, 2.3 g above ground biomass per MJ intercepted radiation was produced. Therefore, measurement of radiation interception by the canopy can be used as a tool to estimate the N status of the crop.
    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)3-19
    JournalNetherlands Journal of Agricultural Science
    Volume44
    Publication statusPublished - 1996

    Fingerprint

    Brussels sprouts
    leeks
    Onions
    interception
    dry matter accumulation
    dry matter
    Nitrogen
    uptake mechanisms
    Light
    application rate
    nitrogen
    leaf area
    Fertilizers
    Growth
    crop
    leaf area index
    Radiation
    crops
    transplanting (plants)
    nitrogen fertilizers

    Cite this

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    title = "Effect of nitrogen availability on dry matter production, nitrogen uptake and light interception of Brussels sprouts and leeks",
    abstract = "In field experiments with Brussels sprouts (cv. Kundry) and leeks (cv. Arcona) on a sandy soil, DM production and N uptake during crop growth were studied at different N application rates. N fertilizer application rate affected DM production, leaf area expansion and N uptake more strongly in Brussels sprouts than in leeks. When all N was applied before transplanting, Brussels sprouts showed a higher recovery of N fertilizer than leeks. This was explained by a higher rate of DM production in Brussels sprouts, a consequence of faster leaf area expansion. Late N application, whether as a part of a split application or not, increased N uptake more than DM production, so that tissue N concentrations increased. The relationship between N uptake and DM production depended on N availability and crop growth stage, and if all N was applied before transplanting, the relationship could be described by an asymptotic function. Plant plasticity allowed 'luxury consumption' of N to take place when availability was ample and 'dilution' of N when shortages developed during later growth stages. This implied an increasing tissue N concentration with increasing N application and a decreasing N concentration with increasing age. To achieve near-maximum DM production at any time, tissue N concentration should be kept at 2.8-3.1{\%} DW during the whole growing period for Brussels sprouts as well as for leeks. However, in Brussels sprouts a minimum concentration of 1.2-1.5{\%} DW still allowed growth. In both crops N uptake increased linearly with LAI until maximum leaf area (LAI = 4-5) was reached and this relationship was not affected by N application rate or by experimental year. Irrespective of N application rate or species, 2.3 g above ground biomass per MJ intercepted radiation was produced. Therefore, measurement of radiation interception by the canopy can be used as a tool to estimate the N status of the crop.",
    author = "R. Booij and A.D.H. Kreuzer and A.L. Smit and {van der Werf}, A.",
    year = "1996",
    language = "English",
    volume = "44",
    pages = "3--19",
    journal = "Netherlands Journal of Agricultural Science",
    issn = "0028-2928",
    publisher = "Koninklijk Landbouwkundige Vereniging/Royal Netherlands Society of Agricultural Sciences",

    }

    Effect of nitrogen availability on dry matter production, nitrogen uptake and light interception of Brussels sprouts and leeks. / Booij, R.; Kreuzer, A.D.H.; Smit, A.L.; van der Werf, A.

    In: Netherlands Journal of Agricultural Science, Vol. 44, 1996, p. 3-19.

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticleAcademicpeer-review

    TY - JOUR

    T1 - Effect of nitrogen availability on dry matter production, nitrogen uptake and light interception of Brussels sprouts and leeks

    AU - Booij, R.

    AU - Kreuzer, A.D.H.

    AU - Smit, A.L.

    AU - van der Werf, A.

    PY - 1996

    Y1 - 1996

    N2 - In field experiments with Brussels sprouts (cv. Kundry) and leeks (cv. Arcona) on a sandy soil, DM production and N uptake during crop growth were studied at different N application rates. N fertilizer application rate affected DM production, leaf area expansion and N uptake more strongly in Brussels sprouts than in leeks. When all N was applied before transplanting, Brussels sprouts showed a higher recovery of N fertilizer than leeks. This was explained by a higher rate of DM production in Brussels sprouts, a consequence of faster leaf area expansion. Late N application, whether as a part of a split application or not, increased N uptake more than DM production, so that tissue N concentrations increased. The relationship between N uptake and DM production depended on N availability and crop growth stage, and if all N was applied before transplanting, the relationship could be described by an asymptotic function. Plant plasticity allowed 'luxury consumption' of N to take place when availability was ample and 'dilution' of N when shortages developed during later growth stages. This implied an increasing tissue N concentration with increasing N application and a decreasing N concentration with increasing age. To achieve near-maximum DM production at any time, tissue N concentration should be kept at 2.8-3.1% DW during the whole growing period for Brussels sprouts as well as for leeks. However, in Brussels sprouts a minimum concentration of 1.2-1.5% DW still allowed growth. In both crops N uptake increased linearly with LAI until maximum leaf area (LAI = 4-5) was reached and this relationship was not affected by N application rate or by experimental year. Irrespective of N application rate or species, 2.3 g above ground biomass per MJ intercepted radiation was produced. Therefore, measurement of radiation interception by the canopy can be used as a tool to estimate the N status of the crop.

    AB - In field experiments with Brussels sprouts (cv. Kundry) and leeks (cv. Arcona) on a sandy soil, DM production and N uptake during crop growth were studied at different N application rates. N fertilizer application rate affected DM production, leaf area expansion and N uptake more strongly in Brussels sprouts than in leeks. When all N was applied before transplanting, Brussels sprouts showed a higher recovery of N fertilizer than leeks. This was explained by a higher rate of DM production in Brussels sprouts, a consequence of faster leaf area expansion. Late N application, whether as a part of a split application or not, increased N uptake more than DM production, so that tissue N concentrations increased. The relationship between N uptake and DM production depended on N availability and crop growth stage, and if all N was applied before transplanting, the relationship could be described by an asymptotic function. Plant plasticity allowed 'luxury consumption' of N to take place when availability was ample and 'dilution' of N when shortages developed during later growth stages. This implied an increasing tissue N concentration with increasing N application and a decreasing N concentration with increasing age. To achieve near-maximum DM production at any time, tissue N concentration should be kept at 2.8-3.1% DW during the whole growing period for Brussels sprouts as well as for leeks. However, in Brussels sprouts a minimum concentration of 1.2-1.5% DW still allowed growth. In both crops N uptake increased linearly with LAI until maximum leaf area (LAI = 4-5) was reached and this relationship was not affected by N application rate or by experimental year. Irrespective of N application rate or species, 2.3 g above ground biomass per MJ intercepted radiation was produced. Therefore, measurement of radiation interception by the canopy can be used as a tool to estimate the N status of the crop.

    M3 - Article

    VL - 44

    SP - 3

    EP - 19

    JO - Netherlands Journal of Agricultural Science

    JF - Netherlands Journal of Agricultural Science

    SN - 0028-2928

    ER -