Effect of EC and transpiration on production of greenhouse tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum L.)

Y. Li, C. Stanghellini, H. Challa

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticleAcademicpeer-review

    94 Citations (Scopus)

    Abstract

    We investigated the hypothesis that manipulating water out-flow of a plant through the shoot environment (potential transpiration, ET0) in a glasshouse could modulate the effect of salinity/osmotic potential in the root environment upon yield of tomatoes. Contrasting root-zone salinity treatments were combined with two climate treatments –– a reference (high transpiration, HET0) and a "depressed" transpiration (low transpiration, LET0). The salinity treatments, characterised by their electrical conductivity (EC) were 6.5, 8 and 9.5 dS m-1, were always coupled with a reference treatment of EC=2 dS m-1. In another experiment, concentrated nutrients (Nutrients) and nutrients with sodium chloride (NaCl) at the same EC of 9 dS m-1 were compared. Marketable fresh-yield production efficiency decreased by 5.1 or each dS m-1 in excess of 2 dS m-1. The number of harvested fruits was not affected; yield loss resulted from reduced fruit weight (3.8 er dS m-1) and an increased fraction of unmarketable harvest. At the LET0 treatments, yield loss was only 3.4 er dS m-1 in accordance with the reduction in fruit weight. Low transpiration did increase fruit fresh yield by 8 n both NaCl and Nutrients treatments at an EC=9 dS m-1. Neither EC nor ET0 affected individual fruit dry weight. Accordingly, fruit dry matter content was significantly higher at high EC than in the reference (4 er each EC unit in excess of 2 dS m-1) and responded to ET0 to a minor extent. Control of the shoot environment in a greenhouse to manipulate the fresh weight of the product may mitigate the effects of poor quality irrigation water without affecting product quality.
    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)11-29
    JournalScientia Horticulturae
    Volume88
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - 2001

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    greenhouse production
    Solanum lycopersicum var. lycopersicum
    electrical conductivity
    transpiration
    tomatoes
    fruits
    sodium chloride
    nutrients
    salinity
    greenhouses
    shoots
    raw fruit
    dry matter content
    osmotic pressure
    product quality
    irrigation water
    rhizosphere
    climate

    Cite this

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    title = "Effect of EC and transpiration on production of greenhouse tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum L.)",
    abstract = "We investigated the hypothesis that manipulating water out-flow of a plant through the shoot environment (potential transpiration, ET0) in a glasshouse could modulate the effect of salinity/osmotic potential in the root environment upon yield of tomatoes. Contrasting root-zone salinity treatments were combined with two climate treatments –– a reference (high transpiration, HET0) and a {"}depressed{"} transpiration (low transpiration, LET0). The salinity treatments, characterised by their electrical conductivity (EC) were 6.5, 8 and 9.5 dS m-1, were always coupled with a reference treatment of EC=2 dS m-1. In another experiment, concentrated nutrients (Nutrients) and nutrients with sodium chloride (NaCl) at the same EC of 9 dS m-1 were compared. Marketable fresh-yield production efficiency decreased by 5.1 or each dS m-1 in excess of 2 dS m-1. The number of harvested fruits was not affected; yield loss resulted from reduced fruit weight (3.8 er dS m-1) and an increased fraction of unmarketable harvest. At the LET0 treatments, yield loss was only 3.4 er dS m-1 in accordance with the reduction in fruit weight. Low transpiration did increase fruit fresh yield by 8 n both NaCl and Nutrients treatments at an EC=9 dS m-1. Neither EC nor ET0 affected individual fruit dry weight. Accordingly, fruit dry matter content was significantly higher at high EC than in the reference (4 er each EC unit in excess of 2 dS m-1) and responded to ET0 to a minor extent. Control of the shoot environment in a greenhouse to manipulate the fresh weight of the product may mitigate the effects of poor quality irrigation water without affecting product quality.",
    author = "Y. Li and C. Stanghellini and H. Challa",
    year = "2001",
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    language = "English",
    volume = "88",
    pages = "11--29",
    journal = "Scientia Horticulturae",
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    Effect of EC and transpiration on production of greenhouse tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum L.). / Li, Y.; Stanghellini, C.; Challa, H.

    In: Scientia Horticulturae, Vol. 88, 2001, p. 11-29.

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticleAcademicpeer-review

    TY - JOUR

    T1 - Effect of EC and transpiration on production of greenhouse tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum L.)

    AU - Li, Y.

    AU - Stanghellini, C.

    AU - Challa, H.

    PY - 2001

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    N2 - We investigated the hypothesis that manipulating water out-flow of a plant through the shoot environment (potential transpiration, ET0) in a glasshouse could modulate the effect of salinity/osmotic potential in the root environment upon yield of tomatoes. Contrasting root-zone salinity treatments were combined with two climate treatments –– a reference (high transpiration, HET0) and a "depressed" transpiration (low transpiration, LET0). The salinity treatments, characterised by their electrical conductivity (EC) were 6.5, 8 and 9.5 dS m-1, were always coupled with a reference treatment of EC=2 dS m-1. In another experiment, concentrated nutrients (Nutrients) and nutrients with sodium chloride (NaCl) at the same EC of 9 dS m-1 were compared. Marketable fresh-yield production efficiency decreased by 5.1 or each dS m-1 in excess of 2 dS m-1. The number of harvested fruits was not affected; yield loss resulted from reduced fruit weight (3.8 er dS m-1) and an increased fraction of unmarketable harvest. At the LET0 treatments, yield loss was only 3.4 er dS m-1 in accordance with the reduction in fruit weight. Low transpiration did increase fruit fresh yield by 8 n both NaCl and Nutrients treatments at an EC=9 dS m-1. Neither EC nor ET0 affected individual fruit dry weight. Accordingly, fruit dry matter content was significantly higher at high EC than in the reference (4 er each EC unit in excess of 2 dS m-1) and responded to ET0 to a minor extent. Control of the shoot environment in a greenhouse to manipulate the fresh weight of the product may mitigate the effects of poor quality irrigation water without affecting product quality.

    AB - We investigated the hypothesis that manipulating water out-flow of a plant through the shoot environment (potential transpiration, ET0) in a glasshouse could modulate the effect of salinity/osmotic potential in the root environment upon yield of tomatoes. Contrasting root-zone salinity treatments were combined with two climate treatments –– a reference (high transpiration, HET0) and a "depressed" transpiration (low transpiration, LET0). The salinity treatments, characterised by their electrical conductivity (EC) were 6.5, 8 and 9.5 dS m-1, were always coupled with a reference treatment of EC=2 dS m-1. In another experiment, concentrated nutrients (Nutrients) and nutrients with sodium chloride (NaCl) at the same EC of 9 dS m-1 were compared. Marketable fresh-yield production efficiency decreased by 5.1 or each dS m-1 in excess of 2 dS m-1. The number of harvested fruits was not affected; yield loss resulted from reduced fruit weight (3.8 er dS m-1) and an increased fraction of unmarketable harvest. At the LET0 treatments, yield loss was only 3.4 er dS m-1 in accordance with the reduction in fruit weight. Low transpiration did increase fruit fresh yield by 8 n both NaCl and Nutrients treatments at an EC=9 dS m-1. Neither EC nor ET0 affected individual fruit dry weight. Accordingly, fruit dry matter content was significantly higher at high EC than in the reference (4 er each EC unit in excess of 2 dS m-1) and responded to ET0 to a minor extent. Control of the shoot environment in a greenhouse to manipulate the fresh weight of the product may mitigate the effects of poor quality irrigation water without affecting product quality.

    U2 - 10.1016/S0304-4238(00)00190-4

    DO - 10.1016/S0304-4238(00)00190-4

    M3 - Article

    VL - 88

    SP - 11

    EP - 29

    JO - Scientia Horticulturae

    JF - Scientia Horticulturae

    SN - 0304-4238

    ER -