Effect of different cooking methods on color, phytochemical concentration, and antioxidant capacity of raw and frozen brassica vegetables

Nicoletta Pellegrini*, Emma Chiavaro, Claudio Gardana, Teresa Mazzeo, Daniele Contino, Monica Gallo, Patrizia Riso, Vincenzo Fogliano, Marisa Porrini

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleAcademicpeer-review

152 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

This study evaluated the effect of common cooking practices (i.e., boiling, microwaving, and basket and oven steaming) on the phytochemical content (carotenoids, chlorophylls, glucosinolates, polyphenols, and ascorbic acid), total antioxidant capacity (TAC), and color changes of three generally consumed Brassica vegetables analyzed fresh and frozen. Among cooking procedures, boiling determined an increase of fresh broccoli carotenoids and fresh Brussels sprout polyphenols, whereas a decrease of almost all other phytochemicals in fresh and frozen samples was observed. Steaming procedures determined a release of polyphenols in both fresh and frozen samples. Microwaving was the best cooking method for maintaining the color of both fresh and frozen vegetables and obtaining a good retention of glucosinolates. During all cooking procedures, ascorbic acid was lost in great amount from all vegetables. Chlorophylls were more stable in frozen samples than in fresh ones, even though steaming methods were able to better preserve these compounds in fresh samples than others cooking methods applied. The overall results of this study demonstrate that fresh Brassica vegetables retain phytochemicals and TAC better than frozen samples.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)4310-4321
Number of pages12
JournalJournal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry
Volume58
Issue number7
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 14 Apr 2010
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • Boiling
  • Broccoli
  • Brussels sprouts
  • Cauliflower
  • Color
  • Microwaving
  • Steaming

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