Dynamical indicators of resilience in postural balance time series are related to successful aging in high-functioning older adults

Sanne Gijzel, I.A. van de Leemput, M. Scheffer, Geert van Bon, V. Weerdesteyn, T.M.H. Eijsvogels, Maria T.E. Hopman, M.G.M. Olde Rikkert, René J.F. Melis*

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleAcademicpeer-review

4 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: Finding ways to quantify resilience as a predictor of a person’s resistance to health challenges is important to improve healthy aging. This study investigated a unique sample of high-functioning older persons in whom traditional markers of frailty and functional decline are largely absent. Translating complex dynamical systems theory to humans, dynamical indicators of resilience in postural balance time series may sensitively discriminate levels of resilience. Methods: This study investigated 240 high-functioning older adults (mean age 83.9 ± 2.9 years, 59% male), of whom 94 hikers of the Nijmegen Four Days Marches. Participants stood upright on a force plate with eyes open and feet at shoulder width for 30 seconds. Center of pressure data were analyzed for dynamical indicators of resilience (variance and temporal autocorrelation). After 1 year, participants were compared on a modified Successful Aging Index. Results: Mediolateral center of pressure displacement of hikers exhibited significantly lower variance (2.2 vs 2.8 mm, p < .001) and temporal autocorrelation (0.59 vs 0.65, p = .006), compared with nonhikers. Multivariably adjusted, mediolateral variance was significantly associated with successful aging at baseline (b = −1.43, p = .003) and 1-year follow-up (b = −1.94, p < .001), while mediolateral temporal autocorrelation was not. Conclusions: Two dynamical indicators of resilience (variance and temporal autocorrelation) calculated on time series of mediolateral center of pressure displacement differed between hikers and nonhikers within a group of high-functioning older adults. In the whole group, variance was independently associated with successful aging at baseline and after 1 year. Our results support the hypothesis that resilience of older persons may be estimated from time series of natural fluctuations of bodily functions.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1119-1126
JournalJournals of Gerontology. Series A: Biological Sciences & Medical Sciences
Volume74
Issue number7
Early online date25 Jul 2018
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jul 2019

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Postural Balance
Pressure
Systems Theory
Foot
Health

Cite this

Gijzel, Sanne ; van de Leemput, I.A. ; Scheffer, M. ; van Bon, Geert ; Weerdesteyn, V. ; Eijsvogels, T.M.H. ; Hopman, Maria T.E. ; Olde Rikkert, M.G.M. ; Melis, René J.F. / Dynamical indicators of resilience in postural balance time series are related to successful aging in high-functioning older adults. In: Journals of Gerontology. Series A: Biological Sciences & Medical Sciences. 2019 ; Vol. 74, No. 7. pp. 1119-1126.
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title = "Dynamical indicators of resilience in postural balance time series are related to successful aging in high-functioning older adults",
abstract = "Background: Finding ways to quantify resilience as a predictor of a person’s resistance to health challenges is important to improve healthy aging. This study investigated a unique sample of high-functioning older persons in whom traditional markers of frailty and functional decline are largely absent. Translating complex dynamical systems theory to humans, dynamical indicators of resilience in postural balance time series may sensitively discriminate levels of resilience. Methods: This study investigated 240 high-functioning older adults (mean age 83.9 ± 2.9 years, 59{\%} male), of whom 94 hikers of the Nijmegen Four Days Marches. Participants stood upright on a force plate with eyes open and feet at shoulder width for 30 seconds. Center of pressure data were analyzed for dynamical indicators of resilience (variance and temporal autocorrelation). After 1 year, participants were compared on a modified Successful Aging Index. Results: Mediolateral center of pressure displacement of hikers exhibited significantly lower variance (2.2 vs 2.8 mm, p < .001) and temporal autocorrelation (0.59 vs 0.65, p = .006), compared with nonhikers. Multivariably adjusted, mediolateral variance was significantly associated with successful aging at baseline (b = −1.43, p = .003) and 1-year follow-up (b = −1.94, p < .001), while mediolateral temporal autocorrelation was not. Conclusions: Two dynamical indicators of resilience (variance and temporal autocorrelation) calculated on time series of mediolateral center of pressure displacement differed between hikers and nonhikers within a group of high-functioning older adults. In the whole group, variance was independently associated with successful aging at baseline and after 1 year. Our results support the hypothesis that resilience of older persons may be estimated from time series of natural fluctuations of bodily functions.",
author = "Sanne Gijzel and {van de Leemput}, I.A. and M. Scheffer and {van Bon}, Geert and V. Weerdesteyn and T.M.H. Eijsvogels and Hopman, {Maria T.E.} and {Olde Rikkert}, M.G.M. and Melis, {Ren{\'e} J.F.}",
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Dynamical indicators of resilience in postural balance time series are related to successful aging in high-functioning older adults. / Gijzel, Sanne; van de Leemput, I.A.; Scheffer, M.; van Bon, Geert; Weerdesteyn, V.; Eijsvogels, T.M.H.; Hopman, Maria T.E.; Olde Rikkert, M.G.M.; Melis, René J.F.

In: Journals of Gerontology. Series A: Biological Sciences & Medical Sciences, Vol. 74, No. 7, 07.2019, p. 1119-1126.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleAcademicpeer-review

TY - JOUR

T1 - Dynamical indicators of resilience in postural balance time series are related to successful aging in high-functioning older adults

AU - Gijzel, Sanne

AU - van de Leemput, I.A.

AU - Scheffer, M.

AU - van Bon, Geert

AU - Weerdesteyn, V.

AU - Eijsvogels, T.M.H.

AU - Hopman, Maria T.E.

AU - Olde Rikkert, M.G.M.

AU - Melis, René J.F.

PY - 2019/7

Y1 - 2019/7

N2 - Background: Finding ways to quantify resilience as a predictor of a person’s resistance to health challenges is important to improve healthy aging. This study investigated a unique sample of high-functioning older persons in whom traditional markers of frailty and functional decline are largely absent. Translating complex dynamical systems theory to humans, dynamical indicators of resilience in postural balance time series may sensitively discriminate levels of resilience. Methods: This study investigated 240 high-functioning older adults (mean age 83.9 ± 2.9 years, 59% male), of whom 94 hikers of the Nijmegen Four Days Marches. Participants stood upright on a force plate with eyes open and feet at shoulder width for 30 seconds. Center of pressure data were analyzed for dynamical indicators of resilience (variance and temporal autocorrelation). After 1 year, participants were compared on a modified Successful Aging Index. Results: Mediolateral center of pressure displacement of hikers exhibited significantly lower variance (2.2 vs 2.8 mm, p < .001) and temporal autocorrelation (0.59 vs 0.65, p = .006), compared with nonhikers. Multivariably adjusted, mediolateral variance was significantly associated with successful aging at baseline (b = −1.43, p = .003) and 1-year follow-up (b = −1.94, p < .001), while mediolateral temporal autocorrelation was not. Conclusions: Two dynamical indicators of resilience (variance and temporal autocorrelation) calculated on time series of mediolateral center of pressure displacement differed between hikers and nonhikers within a group of high-functioning older adults. In the whole group, variance was independently associated with successful aging at baseline and after 1 year. Our results support the hypothesis that resilience of older persons may be estimated from time series of natural fluctuations of bodily functions.

AB - Background: Finding ways to quantify resilience as a predictor of a person’s resistance to health challenges is important to improve healthy aging. This study investigated a unique sample of high-functioning older persons in whom traditional markers of frailty and functional decline are largely absent. Translating complex dynamical systems theory to humans, dynamical indicators of resilience in postural balance time series may sensitively discriminate levels of resilience. Methods: This study investigated 240 high-functioning older adults (mean age 83.9 ± 2.9 years, 59% male), of whom 94 hikers of the Nijmegen Four Days Marches. Participants stood upright on a force plate with eyes open and feet at shoulder width for 30 seconds. Center of pressure data were analyzed for dynamical indicators of resilience (variance and temporal autocorrelation). After 1 year, participants were compared on a modified Successful Aging Index. Results: Mediolateral center of pressure displacement of hikers exhibited significantly lower variance (2.2 vs 2.8 mm, p < .001) and temporal autocorrelation (0.59 vs 0.65, p = .006), compared with nonhikers. Multivariably adjusted, mediolateral variance was significantly associated with successful aging at baseline (b = −1.43, p = .003) and 1-year follow-up (b = −1.94, p < .001), while mediolateral temporal autocorrelation was not. Conclusions: Two dynamical indicators of resilience (variance and temporal autocorrelation) calculated on time series of mediolateral center of pressure displacement differed between hikers and nonhikers within a group of high-functioning older adults. In the whole group, variance was independently associated with successful aging at baseline and after 1 year. Our results support the hypothesis that resilience of older persons may be estimated from time series of natural fluctuations of bodily functions.

U2 - 10.1093/gerona/gly170

DO - 10.1093/gerona/gly170

M3 - Article

VL - 74

SP - 1119

EP - 1126

JO - Journals of Gerontology. Series A: Biological Sciences & Medical Sciences

JF - Journals of Gerontology. Series A: Biological Sciences & Medical Sciences

SN - 1079-5006

IS - 7

ER -