Do we need Berlin Walls or Chinese Walls between research, public consultation and advice? New public responsibilities for life scientist

M.J.J.A.A. Korthals

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticleAcademicpeer-review

    Abstract

    During the coming decades, life scientists will become involved more than ever in the public and private lives of patients and consumers, as health and food sciences shift from a collective approach towards individualization, from a curative to a preventive approach, and from being driven by desires rather than by technology. This means that the traditional relationships between the activities of life scientists – conducting research, advising industry, governments, and patients/consumers, consulting the public, and prescribing products, be it patents, drugs or food products, information, or advice – are getting blurred. Traditional concepts of the individual, role, task, and collective responsibility have to be revised. This paper argues, from a pragmatic point of view, that the concept of public responsibility can contribute considerably in delineating new gray zones between the various roles of the life scientist: conducting research for governments or industry, giving advice, prescribing and selling products, and doing public consultation. The main issues are where new Chinese walls (not Berlin walls) need to be built between these activities, thereby increasing trust between life scientists and the public at large, and how to organize research agendas and to decide upon research topics.
    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)385-395
    JournalJournal of Academic Ethics
    Volume1
    Issue number4
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - 2004

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