Do Incentives Matter for the Diffusion of Financial Knowledge? Experimental Evidence from Uganda

John Sseruyange, Erwin Bulte*

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleAcademicpeer-review

5 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Many development interventions involve training of beneficiaries, based on the assumption that knowledge and skills will spread ‘automatically’ among a wider target population. However, diffusion of knowledge or innovations can be slow and incomplete. We use a randomised field experiment in Uganda to assess the impact of providing incentives for knowledge diffusion, and pay trained individuals a fee if they share knowledge obtained during a financial literacy training. Our main results are that incentives increase knowledge sharing, and that it may be cost-effective to provide such incentives. We also document an absence of assortative matching in the social learning process.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)612-631
JournalJournal of African Economies
Volume27
Issue number5
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Nov 2018

Keywords

  • incentives for diffusion
  • knowledge sharing
  • spread of innovations

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