Distinct feeding behavior between sexes of Frankliniella occidentalis results in higher scar production and lower tospovirus transmission by females.

F. van de Wetering, J. Hulshof, K. Posthuma, P. Harrewijn, R. Goldbach, D. Peters

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleAcademicpeer-review

49 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Feeding behavior and scar production of male and female F. occidentalis (Pergande) (Thysanoptera: Thripidae) were studied in relation to transmission of tomato spotted wilt tospovirus (TSWV). Electrical penetration graph (EPG) analysis showed that females feed more frequently and intensively than males. The feeding intensity, reflected by silvery scar production and studied by an image analysis system, demonstrated that females induced more numerous scars than males. At the same time, males transmitted TSWV with a higher efficiency than females, indicating that TSWV transmission and scar production are not positively correlated. Furthermore, males produced significantly more local lesions of TSWV than females. These quantitative differences in scar production and transmission of TSWV can be explained by the lower mobility and higher consumption rate of females. The influence of the sex-ratio on crop damage and virus transmission, and thus to the spread of TSWV, is emphasized.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)9-15
JournalEntomologia Experimentalis et Applicata
Volume88
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1998

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