Dispersal and functional response of Uscana lariophaga in two different habitats: stored cowpea pods and seeds

F.A.N. van Alebeek, K.K. Antwi, A. van Huis, J.C. van Lenteren

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleAcademicpeer-review

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The effect of two different habitats, stored cowpea [Vigna unguiculata (L.) Walpers] pods and seeds, on the dispersal and functional response of Uscana lariophaga Steffan (Hymenoptera Trichogrammatidae) was investigated, with Callosobruchus maculatus (F.) (Coleoptera Bruchidae) eggs as hosts. In the presence of directional light from the top, parasitoids moved faster through columns filled with pods than through columns (either filled with pods or seeds) in darkness. The different habitats, seed or pods, did not have a significant effect on dispersal. The maximal dispersal rate of colonising U. lariophaga females may be up to several meter per day, and median net displacement rates are around 0.5 - 0.8 m per 24 h. The functional response of U. lariophaga could be described by Rogers (1972) random parasitoid equation as a Holling Type II curve and resembles the ones found in earlier experiments. At host densities below 40 eggs per cluster, U. lariophaga was more efficient at finding host eggs in a seed habitat than in a pod habitat, probably due to area restricted searching behaviour after oviposition. At higher host densities, U. lariophaga becomes egg limited, and neither walking behaviour nor the habitat structure significantly influence her foraging success.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)63-70
JournalBulletin of Insectology
Volume60
Issue number1
Publication statusPublished - 2007

Keywords

  • maculatus f coleoptera
  • callosobruchus-chinensis l
  • predator prey interactions
  • azuki-bean weevil
  • vigna-unguiculata
  • vertical dispersion
  • egg distribution
  • host location
  • body size
  • bruchidae

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'Dispersal and functional response of Uscana lariophaga in two different habitats: stored cowpea pods and seeds'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this