Dietary patterns, cognitive decline, and dementia: a systematic review

Research output: Contribution to journalReview articleAcademicpeer-review

118 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Nutrition is an important modifiable risk factor that plays a role in the strategy to prevent or delay the onset of dementia. Research on nutritional effects has until now mainly focused on the role of individual nutrients and bioactive components. However, the evidence for combined effects, such as multinutrient approaches, or a healthy dietary pattern, such as the Mediterranean diet, is growing. These approaches incorporate the complexity of the diet and possible interaction and synergy between nutrients. Over the past few years, dietary patterns have increasingly been investigated to better understand the link between diet, cognitive decline, and dementia. In this systematic review we provide an overview of the literature on human studies up to May 2014 that examined the role of dietary patterns (derived both a priori as well as a posteriori) in relation to cognitive decline or dementia. The results suggest that better adherence to a Mediterranean diet is associated with less cognitive decline, dementia, or Alzheimer disease, as shown by 4 of 6 cross-sectional studies, 6 of 12 longitudinal studies, 1 trial, and 3 meta-analyses. Other healthy dietary patterns, derived both a priori (e.g., Healthy Diet Indicator, Healthy Eating Index, and Program National Nutrition Santé guideline score) and a posteriori (e.g., factor analysis, cluster analysis, and reduced rank regression), were shown to be associated with reduced cognitive decline and/or a reduced risk of dementia as shown by all 6 cross-sectional studies and 6 of 8 longitudinal studies. More conclusive evidence is needed to reach more targeted and detailed guidelines to prevent or postpone cognitive decline.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)154-168
JournalAdvances in Nutrition
Volume6
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2015

Fingerprint

dementia
systematic review
eating habits
Dementia
Mediterranean Diet
Mediterranean diet
healthy diet
longitudinal studies
cross-sectional studies
Longitudinal Studies
Cross-Sectional Studies
nutrition
Diet
Food
Nutrition Policy
nutrients
Alzheimer disease
diet
Statistical Factor Analysis
Cluster Analysis

Keywords

  • healthy eating index
  • mediterranean diet
  • alzheimers-disease
  • nutritional epidemiology
  • stop hypertension
  • physical-activity
  • randomized-trial
  • cluster-analysis
  • elderly-people
  • blood-pressure

Cite this

@article{b4926e78e8ea4d988aeddebbc94cf4e3,
title = "Dietary patterns, cognitive decline, and dementia: a systematic review",
abstract = "Nutrition is an important modifiable risk factor that plays a role in the strategy to prevent or delay the onset of dementia. Research on nutritional effects has until now mainly focused on the role of individual nutrients and bioactive components. However, the evidence for combined effects, such as multinutrient approaches, or a healthy dietary pattern, such as the Mediterranean diet, is growing. These approaches incorporate the complexity of the diet and possible interaction and synergy between nutrients. Over the past few years, dietary patterns have increasingly been investigated to better understand the link between diet, cognitive decline, and dementia. In this systematic review we provide an overview of the literature on human studies up to May 2014 that examined the role of dietary patterns (derived both a priori as well as a posteriori) in relation to cognitive decline or dementia. The results suggest that better adherence to a Mediterranean diet is associated with less cognitive decline, dementia, or Alzheimer disease, as shown by 4 of 6 cross-sectional studies, 6 of 12 longitudinal studies, 1 trial, and 3 meta-analyses. Other healthy dietary patterns, derived both a priori (e.g., Healthy Diet Indicator, Healthy Eating Index, and Program National Nutrition Sant{\'e} guideline score) and a posteriori (e.g., factor analysis, cluster analysis, and reduced rank regression), were shown to be associated with reduced cognitive decline and/or a reduced risk of dementia as shown by all 6 cross-sectional studies and 6 of 8 longitudinal studies. More conclusive evidence is needed to reach more targeted and detailed guidelines to prevent or postpone cognitive decline.",
keywords = "healthy eating index, mediterranean diet, alzheimers-disease, nutritional epidemiology, stop hypertension, physical-activity, randomized-trial, cluster-analysis, elderly-people, blood-pressure",
author = "{van de Rest}, O. and A.M. Berendsen and A. Haveman-Nies and {de Groot}, C.P.G.M.",
year = "2015",
doi = "10.3945/an.114.007617",
language = "English",
volume = "6",
pages = "154--168",
journal = "Advances in Nutrition",
issn = "2161-8313",
publisher = "American Society for Nutrition",

}

Dietary patterns, cognitive decline, and dementia: a systematic review. / van de Rest, O.; Berendsen, A.M.; Haveman-Nies, A.; de Groot, C.P.G.M.

In: Advances in Nutrition, Vol. 6, 2015, p. 154-168.

Research output: Contribution to journalReview articleAcademicpeer-review

TY - JOUR

T1 - Dietary patterns, cognitive decline, and dementia: a systematic review

AU - van de Rest, O.

AU - Berendsen, A.M.

AU - Haveman-Nies, A.

AU - de Groot, C.P.G.M.

PY - 2015

Y1 - 2015

N2 - Nutrition is an important modifiable risk factor that plays a role in the strategy to prevent or delay the onset of dementia. Research on nutritional effects has until now mainly focused on the role of individual nutrients and bioactive components. However, the evidence for combined effects, such as multinutrient approaches, or a healthy dietary pattern, such as the Mediterranean diet, is growing. These approaches incorporate the complexity of the diet and possible interaction and synergy between nutrients. Over the past few years, dietary patterns have increasingly been investigated to better understand the link between diet, cognitive decline, and dementia. In this systematic review we provide an overview of the literature on human studies up to May 2014 that examined the role of dietary patterns (derived both a priori as well as a posteriori) in relation to cognitive decline or dementia. The results suggest that better adherence to a Mediterranean diet is associated with less cognitive decline, dementia, or Alzheimer disease, as shown by 4 of 6 cross-sectional studies, 6 of 12 longitudinal studies, 1 trial, and 3 meta-analyses. Other healthy dietary patterns, derived both a priori (e.g., Healthy Diet Indicator, Healthy Eating Index, and Program National Nutrition Santé guideline score) and a posteriori (e.g., factor analysis, cluster analysis, and reduced rank regression), were shown to be associated with reduced cognitive decline and/or a reduced risk of dementia as shown by all 6 cross-sectional studies and 6 of 8 longitudinal studies. More conclusive evidence is needed to reach more targeted and detailed guidelines to prevent or postpone cognitive decline.

AB - Nutrition is an important modifiable risk factor that plays a role in the strategy to prevent or delay the onset of dementia. Research on nutritional effects has until now mainly focused on the role of individual nutrients and bioactive components. However, the evidence for combined effects, such as multinutrient approaches, or a healthy dietary pattern, such as the Mediterranean diet, is growing. These approaches incorporate the complexity of the diet and possible interaction and synergy between nutrients. Over the past few years, dietary patterns have increasingly been investigated to better understand the link between diet, cognitive decline, and dementia. In this systematic review we provide an overview of the literature on human studies up to May 2014 that examined the role of dietary patterns (derived both a priori as well as a posteriori) in relation to cognitive decline or dementia. The results suggest that better adherence to a Mediterranean diet is associated with less cognitive decline, dementia, or Alzheimer disease, as shown by 4 of 6 cross-sectional studies, 6 of 12 longitudinal studies, 1 trial, and 3 meta-analyses. Other healthy dietary patterns, derived both a priori (e.g., Healthy Diet Indicator, Healthy Eating Index, and Program National Nutrition Santé guideline score) and a posteriori (e.g., factor analysis, cluster analysis, and reduced rank regression), were shown to be associated with reduced cognitive decline and/or a reduced risk of dementia as shown by all 6 cross-sectional studies and 6 of 8 longitudinal studies. More conclusive evidence is needed to reach more targeted and detailed guidelines to prevent or postpone cognitive decline.

KW - healthy eating index

KW - mediterranean diet

KW - alzheimers-disease

KW - nutritional epidemiology

KW - stop hypertension

KW - physical-activity

KW - randomized-trial

KW - cluster-analysis

KW - elderly-people

KW - blood-pressure

U2 - 10.3945/an.114.007617

DO - 10.3945/an.114.007617

M3 - Review article

VL - 6

SP - 154

EP - 168

JO - Advances in Nutrition

JF - Advances in Nutrition

SN - 2161-8313

ER -