Dietary carbohydrates with different rates of fermentation affect fermentation end-product profiles in different sites of gastro-intestinal tract of weaning piglet

A. Awati, B.A. Williams, M.W. Bosch, M.W.A. Verstegen

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleAcademicpeer-review

8 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

An in vivo experiment was conducted to examine changes in fermentation end-products in the gastro-intestinal tract (GIT) of weaning piglets by the inclusion of fermentable carbohydrates in the diet. The experiment was repeated in three replicates of 36 piglets. Piglets were raised free of antibiotics and creep feeding prior to weaning at 4 weeks of age. Each replicate was conducted over a period of 10 days. The piglets were offered one of two dietary treatments: control diet (CON), and fermentable carbohydrate enriched diet (CHO); and were subjected to one of the two fasting treatments (i) fasting for 2 days in the beginning of the experimental period and (ii) non-fasting. Piglets were slaughtered on the 1st, 4th and 10th day of each period. Digesta samples were collected from: first half of small intestine, second half of small intestine, caecum, and colon. The dry matter, volatile fatty acid (VFA) profile, and ammonia concentrations were analysed. Food intake, growth and food conversion ratio were also recorded. There were no differences in production performances such as growth and food conversion ratio (FCR) between the treatment groups. Concentrations of VFA were significantly higher, while ammonia concentration was significantly lower in the CHO group compared to the CON group in different fermentation sites within the GIT (¿P
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)837-843
Number of pages7
JournalAnimal Science
Volume82
Issue number6
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2006

Keywords

  • large-intestine
  • growing pigs
  • polysaccharides
  • prebiotics

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