Dietary Approach to Stop Hypertension (DASH) diet and risk of renal function decline and all-cause mortality in renal transplant recipients

Maryse C.J. Osté*, António W. Gomes-Neto, Eva Corpeleijn, Rijk O.B. Gans, Martin H. de Borst, Else van den Berg, Sabita S. Soedamah-Muthu, Daan Kromhout, Gerjan J. Navis, Stephan J.L. Bakker

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleAcademicpeer-review

4 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Renal transplant recipients (RTR) are at risk of decline of graft function and premature mortality, with high blood pressure as an important risk factor for both. To study the association of the Dietary Approach to Stop Hypertension (DASH) diet with these adverse events, we conducted a prospective cohort study of adult RTR. Dietary data were collected using a validated 177-item food frequency questionnaire and an overall DASH-score was obtained. We included 632 stable RTR (mean ± standard deviation age 53.0 ± 12.7 years, 57% men). Mean DASH score was 23.8 ± 4.7. During median follow-up of 5.3 (interquartile range, 4.1-6.0) years, 119 (18.8%) RTR had renal function decline, defined as a combined endpoint of doubling of serum creatinine and death-censored graft failure, and 128 (20.3%) died. In Cox-regression analyses, RTR in the highest tertile of the DASH score had lower risk of both renal function decline (hazard ratio [HR] = 0.57; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.33-0.96, P = .03) and all-cause mortality (HR = 0.52; 95%CI, 0.32-0.83, P = .006) compared to the lowest tertile, independent of potential confounders. Adherence to a DASH-style diet is associated with lower risk of both renal function decline and all-cause mortality. These results suggest that a healthful diet might benefit long-term outcome in RTR.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)2523-2533
JournalAmerican Journal of Transplantation
Volume18
Issue number10
Early online date21 Feb 2018
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Oct 2018

Fingerprint

Diet
Hypertension
Kidney
Mortality
Confidence Intervals
Transplants
Transplant Recipients
Premature Mortality
Creatinine
Cohort Studies
Regression Analysis
Prospective Studies
Food
Serum

Keywords

  • Clinical research/practice
  • Graft survival
  • Kidney transplantation/nephrology
  • Nutrition
  • Patient survival

Cite this

Osté, M. C. J., Gomes-Neto, A. W., Corpeleijn, E., Gans, R. O. B., de Borst, M. H., van den Berg, E., ... Bakker, S. J. L. (2018). Dietary Approach to Stop Hypertension (DASH) diet and risk of renal function decline and all-cause mortality in renal transplant recipients. American Journal of Transplantation, 18(10), 2523-2533. https://doi.org/10.1111/ajt.14707
Osté, Maryse C.J. ; Gomes-Neto, António W. ; Corpeleijn, Eva ; Gans, Rijk O.B. ; de Borst, Martin H. ; van den Berg, Else ; Soedamah-Muthu, Sabita S. ; Kromhout, Daan ; Navis, Gerjan J. ; Bakker, Stephan J.L. / Dietary Approach to Stop Hypertension (DASH) diet and risk of renal function decline and all-cause mortality in renal transplant recipients. In: American Journal of Transplantation. 2018 ; Vol. 18, No. 10. pp. 2523-2533.
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abstract = "Renal transplant recipients (RTR) are at risk of decline of graft function and premature mortality, with high blood pressure as an important risk factor for both. To study the association of the Dietary Approach to Stop Hypertension (DASH) diet with these adverse events, we conducted a prospective cohort study of adult RTR. Dietary data were collected using a validated 177-item food frequency questionnaire and an overall DASH-score was obtained. We included 632 stable RTR (mean ± standard deviation age 53.0 ± 12.7 years, 57{\%} men). Mean DASH score was 23.8 ± 4.7. During median follow-up of 5.3 (interquartile range, 4.1-6.0) years, 119 (18.8{\%}) RTR had renal function decline, defined as a combined endpoint of doubling of serum creatinine and death-censored graft failure, and 128 (20.3{\%}) died. In Cox-regression analyses, RTR in the highest tertile of the DASH score had lower risk of both renal function decline (hazard ratio [HR] = 0.57; 95{\%} confidence interval [CI], 0.33-0.96, P = .03) and all-cause mortality (HR = 0.52; 95{\%}CI, 0.32-0.83, P = .006) compared to the lowest tertile, independent of potential confounders. Adherence to a DASH-style diet is associated with lower risk of both renal function decline and all-cause mortality. These results suggest that a healthful diet might benefit long-term outcome in RTR.",
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Osté, MCJ, Gomes-Neto, AW, Corpeleijn, E, Gans, ROB, de Borst, MH, van den Berg, E, Soedamah-Muthu, SS, Kromhout, D, Navis, GJ & Bakker, SJL 2018, 'Dietary Approach to Stop Hypertension (DASH) diet and risk of renal function decline and all-cause mortality in renal transplant recipients', American Journal of Transplantation, vol. 18, no. 10, pp. 2523-2533. https://doi.org/10.1111/ajt.14707

Dietary Approach to Stop Hypertension (DASH) diet and risk of renal function decline and all-cause mortality in renal transplant recipients. / Osté, Maryse C.J.; Gomes-Neto, António W.; Corpeleijn, Eva; Gans, Rijk O.B.; de Borst, Martin H.; van den Berg, Else; Soedamah-Muthu, Sabita S.; Kromhout, Daan; Navis, Gerjan J.; Bakker, Stephan J.L.

In: American Journal of Transplantation, Vol. 18, No. 10, 10.2018, p. 2523-2533.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleAcademicpeer-review

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T1 - Dietary Approach to Stop Hypertension (DASH) diet and risk of renal function decline and all-cause mortality in renal transplant recipients

AU - Osté, Maryse C.J.

AU - Gomes-Neto, António W.

AU - Corpeleijn, Eva

AU - Gans, Rijk O.B.

AU - de Borst, Martin H.

AU - van den Berg, Else

AU - Soedamah-Muthu, Sabita S.

AU - Kromhout, Daan

AU - Navis, Gerjan J.

AU - Bakker, Stephan J.L.

PY - 2018/10

Y1 - 2018/10

N2 - Renal transplant recipients (RTR) are at risk of decline of graft function and premature mortality, with high blood pressure as an important risk factor for both. To study the association of the Dietary Approach to Stop Hypertension (DASH) diet with these adverse events, we conducted a prospective cohort study of adult RTR. Dietary data were collected using a validated 177-item food frequency questionnaire and an overall DASH-score was obtained. We included 632 stable RTR (mean ± standard deviation age 53.0 ± 12.7 years, 57% men). Mean DASH score was 23.8 ± 4.7. During median follow-up of 5.3 (interquartile range, 4.1-6.0) years, 119 (18.8%) RTR had renal function decline, defined as a combined endpoint of doubling of serum creatinine and death-censored graft failure, and 128 (20.3%) died. In Cox-regression analyses, RTR in the highest tertile of the DASH score had lower risk of both renal function decline (hazard ratio [HR] = 0.57; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.33-0.96, P = .03) and all-cause mortality (HR = 0.52; 95%CI, 0.32-0.83, P = .006) compared to the lowest tertile, independent of potential confounders. Adherence to a DASH-style diet is associated with lower risk of both renal function decline and all-cause mortality. These results suggest that a healthful diet might benefit long-term outcome in RTR.

AB - Renal transplant recipients (RTR) are at risk of decline of graft function and premature mortality, with high blood pressure as an important risk factor for both. To study the association of the Dietary Approach to Stop Hypertension (DASH) diet with these adverse events, we conducted a prospective cohort study of adult RTR. Dietary data were collected using a validated 177-item food frequency questionnaire and an overall DASH-score was obtained. We included 632 stable RTR (mean ± standard deviation age 53.0 ± 12.7 years, 57% men). Mean DASH score was 23.8 ± 4.7. During median follow-up of 5.3 (interquartile range, 4.1-6.0) years, 119 (18.8%) RTR had renal function decline, defined as a combined endpoint of doubling of serum creatinine and death-censored graft failure, and 128 (20.3%) died. In Cox-regression analyses, RTR in the highest tertile of the DASH score had lower risk of both renal function decline (hazard ratio [HR] = 0.57; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.33-0.96, P = .03) and all-cause mortality (HR = 0.52; 95%CI, 0.32-0.83, P = .006) compared to the lowest tertile, independent of potential confounders. Adherence to a DASH-style diet is associated with lower risk of both renal function decline and all-cause mortality. These results suggest that a healthful diet might benefit long-term outcome in RTR.

KW - Clinical research/practice

KW - Graft survival

KW - Kidney transplantation/nephrology

KW - Nutrition

KW - Patient survival

U2 - 10.1111/ajt.14707

DO - 10.1111/ajt.14707

M3 - Article

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SP - 2523

EP - 2533

JO - American Journal of Transplantation

JF - American Journal of Transplantation

SN - 1600-6135

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ER -