Diet quality among people with intellectual disabilities and borderline intellectual functioning

David A.A. Gast*, Gabriela L.C. de Wit, Amber van Hoof, Jeanne H.M. de Vries, Bert van Hemert, Robert Didden, Erik J. Giltay

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleAcademicpeer-review

8 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: We sought to assess diet quality among people with intellectual disabilities or borderline intellectual functioning, living in residential facilities or receiving day care. Methods: We measured diet quality using the Dutch Healthy Diet Food Frequency Questionnaire (DHD) and compared this between participants with (n = 151) and controls without intellectual disabilities (n = 169). Potential correlates of diet quality were explored. Results: We found lower mean diet quality among people with intellectual disabilities (M = 80.9) compared to controls (M = 111.2; mean adjusted difference −28.4; 95% CI [−32.3, −24.5]; p <.001). Participants with borderline intellectual functioning and mild intellectual disabilities had lower diet quality and higher body mass index than individuals with severe to profound intellectual disabilities. Being female was a predictor of better diet quality. Conclusions: Overall, we found that diet quality was low in the sample of people with intellectual disabilities or borderline intellectual functioning.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)488-494
JournalJournal of Applied Research in Intellectual Disabilities
Volume35
Issue number2
Early online date26 Oct 2021
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Mar 2022

Keywords

  • body mass index
  • borderline intellectual functioning
  • diet quality
  • intellectual disabilities

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