Diet-induced thermogenesis and satiety in humans after full-fat and reduced-fat meals.

M.S. Westerterp-Plantenga, N.E. Wijckmans-Duijsens, W.P. Verboeket-van de Venne, K. de Graaf, J.A. Weststrate, K.H. van het Hof

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Abstract

Diet-induced thermogenesis was measured during and after a full-fat lunch, an identical but reduced-fat, reduced-energy lunch, and an iso-energetic reduced-fat lunch in 32 normal-weight men and women, age 35-55. Hunger and satiety were scored during and after the lunches, and their relationship to diet-induced thermogenesis was assessed. Diet-induced thermogenesis was relatively higher after the reduced-far, reduced-energy lunch compared to the full-fat lunch (6.7% vs. 5.2%; p < 0.05). The respiratory quotients were significantly lower after the full-fat lunch than after the 2 reduced-fat lunches (p < 0.05). After the isoenergetic reduced-fat lunch, hunger scores were significantly reduced and satiety scores significantly increased (p < 0.05) until 1800 h, compared to the other 2 lunches. Satiety scores were positively related to the magnitude of diet-induced thermogenesis expressed as an absolute increase in metabolic rate during and after the meal. We conclude that hunger and satiety scores, substrate utilization, and diet-induced thermogenesis showed clear and different short-term responses to diets that differed with respect to the percentage energy from fat and/or the energy content of the meal.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)343-349
JournalPhysiology and Behavior
Volume61
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1997

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    Westerterp-Plantenga, M. S., Wijckmans-Duijsens, N. E., Verboeket-van de Venne, W. P., de Graaf, K., Weststrate, J. A., & van het Hof, K. H. (1997). Diet-induced thermogenesis and satiety in humans after full-fat and reduced-fat meals. Physiology and Behavior, 61, 343-349. https://doi.org/10.1016/S0031-9384(96)00444-1