Diagnosing drought using the downstreamness concept

the effect of reservoir networks on drought evolution

Pieter R. van Oel*, Eduardo S.P.R. Martins, Alexandre C. Costa, Niko Wanders, Henny A.J. van Lanen

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleAcademicpeer-review

4 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

To effectively manage hydrological drought, there is an urgent need to better understand and evaluate its human drivers. Using the “downstreamness” concept, we assess the role of a reservoir network in the emergence and evolution of droughts in a river basin in Brazil. In our case study, the downstreamness concept shows the effect of a network of reservoirs on the spatial distribution of stored surface water volumes over time. We demonstrate that, as a consequence of meteorological drought and recovery, the distribution of stored volumes became spatially skewed towards upstream locations, which affected the duration and magnitude of hydrological drought both upstream (where drought was alleviated) and downstream (where drought was aggravated). The downstreamness concept thus appears to be a useful entry point for spatiotemporally explicit assessments of hydrological drought and for determining the likelihood of progression from meteorological drought to a human-modified hydrological drought in a basin.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)979-990
JournalHydrological Sciences Journal
Volume63
Issue number7
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 14 May 2018

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drought
effect
river basin
spatial distribution
surface water
basin

Keywords

  • downstreamness
  • hydrological drought
  • reservoirs
  • SPI
  • water management

Cite this

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title = "Diagnosing drought using the downstreamness concept: the effect of reservoir networks on drought evolution",
abstract = "To effectively manage hydrological drought, there is an urgent need to better understand and evaluate its human drivers. Using the “downstreamness” concept, we assess the role of a reservoir network in the emergence and evolution of droughts in a river basin in Brazil. In our case study, the downstreamness concept shows the effect of a network of reservoirs on the spatial distribution of stored surface water volumes over time. We demonstrate that, as a consequence of meteorological drought and recovery, the distribution of stored volumes became spatially skewed towards upstream locations, which affected the duration and magnitude of hydrological drought both upstream (where drought was alleviated) and downstream (where drought was aggravated). The downstreamness concept thus appears to be a useful entry point for spatiotemporally explicit assessments of hydrological drought and for determining the likelihood of progression from meteorological drought to a human-modified hydrological drought in a basin.",
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Diagnosing drought using the downstreamness concept : the effect of reservoir networks on drought evolution. / van Oel, Pieter R.; Martins, Eduardo S.P.R.; Costa, Alexandre C.; Wanders, Niko; van Lanen, Henny A.J.

In: Hydrological Sciences Journal, Vol. 63, No. 7, 14.05.2018, p. 979-990.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleAcademicpeer-review

TY - JOUR

T1 - Diagnosing drought using the downstreamness concept

T2 - the effect of reservoir networks on drought evolution

AU - van Oel, Pieter R.

AU - Martins, Eduardo S.P.R.

AU - Costa, Alexandre C.

AU - Wanders, Niko

AU - van Lanen, Henny A.J.

PY - 2018/5/14

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AB - To effectively manage hydrological drought, there is an urgent need to better understand and evaluate its human drivers. Using the “downstreamness” concept, we assess the role of a reservoir network in the emergence and evolution of droughts in a river basin in Brazil. In our case study, the downstreamness concept shows the effect of a network of reservoirs on the spatial distribution of stored surface water volumes over time. We demonstrate that, as a consequence of meteorological drought and recovery, the distribution of stored volumes became spatially skewed towards upstream locations, which affected the duration and magnitude of hydrological drought both upstream (where drought was alleviated) and downstream (where drought was aggravated). The downstreamness concept thus appears to be a useful entry point for spatiotemporally explicit assessments of hydrological drought and for determining the likelihood of progression from meteorological drought to a human-modified hydrological drought in a basin.

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