Detection and quantification of classical swine fever virus in air samples originating from infected pigs and experimentally produced aerosols

E. Weesendorp, W.J.M. Landman, A. Stegeman, W.L.A. Loeffen

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticleAcademicpeer-review

    24 Citations (Scopus)

    Abstract

    During epidemics of classical swine fever (CSF), neighbourhood infections occurred where none of the 'traditional' routes of transmission like direct animal contact, swill feeding, transport contact or transmission by people could be identified. A hypothesized route of virus introduction for these herds was airborne transmission. In order to better understand this possible transmission route, we developed a method to detect and quantify classical swine fever virus (CSFV) in air samples using gelatine filters. The air samples were collected from CSFV-infected pigs after experimental aerosolization of the virus. Furthermore, we studied the viability of the virus with time in aerosolized state. Three strains of CSFV were aerosolized in an empty isolator and air samples were taken at different time intervals. The virus remained infective in aerosolized state for at least 30 min with half-life time values ranging from 4.5 to 15 min. During animal experiments, concentrations of 100.3-101.6 TCID50/ m3 CSFV were detected in air samples originating from the air of the pig cages and 100.4-104.0 TCID50/m3 from the expired air of infected animals. This is the first study describing the isolation and quantification of CSFV from air samples originating from infected pigs and their cages, supporting previous findings that airborne transmission of CSF is feasible.
    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)50-62
    JournalVeterinary Microbiology
    Volume127
    Issue number1-2
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - 2008

    Fingerprint

    Classical swine fever virus
    aerosols
    Aerosols
    Swine
    Air
    air
    swine
    airborne transmission
    Classical Swine Fever
    viruses
    hog cholera
    sampling
    Viruses
    cages
    Microbial Viability
    animal experimentation
    gelatin
    half life
    Half-Life
    animals

    Keywords

    • mouth-disease virus
    • hog-cholera
    • airborne transmission
    • enterococcus-faecalis
    • antibody-response
    • epidemic
    • netherlands
    • aerosolization
    • spread
    • area

    Cite this

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    abstract = "During epidemics of classical swine fever (CSF), neighbourhood infections occurred where none of the 'traditional' routes of transmission like direct animal contact, swill feeding, transport contact or transmission by people could be identified. A hypothesized route of virus introduction for these herds was airborne transmission. In order to better understand this possible transmission route, we developed a method to detect and quantify classical swine fever virus (CSFV) in air samples using gelatine filters. The air samples were collected from CSFV-infected pigs after experimental aerosolization of the virus. Furthermore, we studied the viability of the virus with time in aerosolized state. Three strains of CSFV were aerosolized in an empty isolator and air samples were taken at different time intervals. The virus remained infective in aerosolized state for at least 30 min with half-life time values ranging from 4.5 to 15 min. During animal experiments, concentrations of 100.3-101.6 TCID50/ m3 CSFV were detected in air samples originating from the air of the pig cages and 100.4-104.0 TCID50/m3 from the expired air of infected animals. This is the first study describing the isolation and quantification of CSFV from air samples originating from infected pigs and their cages, supporting previous findings that airborne transmission of CSF is feasible.",
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    author = "E. Weesendorp and W.J.M. Landman and A. Stegeman and W.L.A. Loeffen",
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    Detection and quantification of classical swine fever virus in air samples originating from infected pigs and experimentally produced aerosols. / Weesendorp, E.; Landman, W.J.M.; Stegeman, A.; Loeffen, W.L.A.

    In: Veterinary Microbiology, Vol. 127, No. 1-2, 2008, p. 50-62.

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticleAcademicpeer-review

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    AU - Weesendorp, E.

    AU - Landman, W.J.M.

    AU - Stegeman, A.

    AU - Loeffen, W.L.A.

    PY - 2008

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    KW - epidemic

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    KW - spread

    KW - area

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