Designing a runner friendly city. The role of crowdsourced data in urban landscape design

T. Dolders, M. Reiling, M. Brinkhuisen, R.J.A. van Lammeren

Research output: Contribution to conferenceAbstractAcademic

Abstract

Stimulation of sports has become increasingly vital in urban planning. Sports is strongly

related to economy and health issues and many cities are in favour to promote urban public

space as main stage for a more healthy way of living. The study domain of physical activity

and built environment (PABE) studies the environmental-behaviour relationships but

doesn’t offer yet design principles to facilitate the planning of running facilities. In this

paper we present design principles derived from crowdsourced data to improve the spatial

conditions of urban public space for running. The crowdsourced data of 110.000 running

activities from mobile Apps ( Strava, Runkeeper) have been analysed to gain insight in

spatial behaviour of runners and spatial requirements that determine this behaviour. The

data is gathered for Amsterdam, The Netherlands. Differences of running locations are

studied taking into consideration a variety of target groups (long and short distance

runners), times (light and dark hours, days of the week) and physical conditions (outdoor

temperatures). The findings of the crowdsourced analysis is verified by on-site surveys in

which runners were questioned to explain their spatial experiences during running. Design

principles were derived from the analysis results and its verification and applied on two

locations of Amsterdam. The derived principles show planning options for a more runner

friendly city consisting of slow traffic networks that are well recognizable, uninterrupted,

with clear start-stop locations and certain distances. Discussion of the pros and cons of this

crowdsourced data approach finalizes the paper.
Original languageEnglish
Publication statusPublished - 2016
EventInternational Conference urban e-planning: recent developments, emerging issues and future challenges - Institute of Geography and Spatial Planning, University of Lisbon, Portugal, Lisbon, Portugal
Duration: 31 Mar 20161 Apr 2016
https://sites.google.com/site/ijepr2016conference/program-full

Conference

ConferenceInternational Conference urban e-planning: recent developments, emerging issues and future challenges
CountryPortugal
CityLisbon
Period31/03/161/04/16
Internet address

Fingerprint

sport
public space
urban planning
urban landscape
city
analysis
planning
target group
built environment
physical conditions
health
traffic
economy

Cite this

Dolders, T., Reiling, M., Brinkhuisen, M., & van Lammeren, R. J. A. (2016). Designing a runner friendly city. The role of crowdsourced data in urban landscape design. Abstract from International Conference urban e-planning: recent developments, emerging issues and future challenges, Lisbon, Portugal.
Dolders, T. ; Reiling, M. ; Brinkhuisen, M. ; van Lammeren, R.J.A. / Designing a runner friendly city. The role of crowdsourced data in urban landscape design. Abstract from International Conference urban e-planning: recent developments, emerging issues and future challenges, Lisbon, Portugal.
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title = "Designing a runner friendly city. The role of crowdsourced data in urban landscape design",
abstract = "Stimulation of sports has become increasingly vital in urban planning. Sports is stronglyrelated to economy and health issues and many cities are in favour to promote urban publicspace as main stage for a more healthy way of living. The study domain of physical activityand built environment (PABE) studies the environmental-behaviour relationships butdoesn’t offer yet design principles to facilitate the planning of running facilities. In thispaper we present design principles derived from crowdsourced data to improve the spatialconditions of urban public space for running. The crowdsourced data of 110.000 runningactivities from mobile Apps ( Strava, Runkeeper) have been analysed to gain insight inspatial behaviour of runners and spatial requirements that determine this behaviour. Thedata is gathered for Amsterdam, The Netherlands. Differences of running locations arestudied taking into consideration a variety of target groups (long and short distancerunners), times (light and dark hours, days of the week) and physical conditions (outdoortemperatures). The findings of the crowdsourced analysis is verified by on-site surveys inwhich runners were questioned to explain their spatial experiences during running. Designprinciples were derived from the analysis results and its verification and applied on twolocations of Amsterdam. The derived principles show planning options for a more runnerfriendly city consisting of slow traffic networks that are well recognizable, uninterrupted,with clear start-stop locations and certain distances. Discussion of the pros and cons of thiscrowdsourced data approach finalizes the paper.",
author = "T. Dolders and M. Reiling and M. Brinkhuisen and {van Lammeren}, R.J.A.",
year = "2016",
language = "English",
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Dolders, T, Reiling, M, Brinkhuisen, M & van Lammeren, RJA 2016, 'Designing a runner friendly city. The role of crowdsourced data in urban landscape design' International Conference urban e-planning: recent developments, emerging issues and future challenges, Lisbon, Portugal, 31/03/16 - 1/04/16, .

Designing a runner friendly city. The role of crowdsourced data in urban landscape design. / Dolders, T.; Reiling, M.; Brinkhuisen, M.; van Lammeren, R.J.A.

2016. Abstract from International Conference urban e-planning: recent developments, emerging issues and future challenges, Lisbon, Portugal.

Research output: Contribution to conferenceAbstractAcademic

TY - CONF

T1 - Designing a runner friendly city. The role of crowdsourced data in urban landscape design

AU - Dolders, T.

AU - Reiling, M.

AU - Brinkhuisen, M.

AU - van Lammeren, R.J.A.

PY - 2016

Y1 - 2016

N2 - Stimulation of sports has become increasingly vital in urban planning. Sports is stronglyrelated to economy and health issues and many cities are in favour to promote urban publicspace as main stage for a more healthy way of living. The study domain of physical activityand built environment (PABE) studies the environmental-behaviour relationships butdoesn’t offer yet design principles to facilitate the planning of running facilities. In thispaper we present design principles derived from crowdsourced data to improve the spatialconditions of urban public space for running. The crowdsourced data of 110.000 runningactivities from mobile Apps ( Strava, Runkeeper) have been analysed to gain insight inspatial behaviour of runners and spatial requirements that determine this behaviour. Thedata is gathered for Amsterdam, The Netherlands. Differences of running locations arestudied taking into consideration a variety of target groups (long and short distancerunners), times (light and dark hours, days of the week) and physical conditions (outdoortemperatures). The findings of the crowdsourced analysis is verified by on-site surveys inwhich runners were questioned to explain their spatial experiences during running. Designprinciples were derived from the analysis results and its verification and applied on twolocations of Amsterdam. The derived principles show planning options for a more runnerfriendly city consisting of slow traffic networks that are well recognizable, uninterrupted,with clear start-stop locations and certain distances. Discussion of the pros and cons of thiscrowdsourced data approach finalizes the paper.

AB - Stimulation of sports has become increasingly vital in urban planning. Sports is stronglyrelated to economy and health issues and many cities are in favour to promote urban publicspace as main stage for a more healthy way of living. The study domain of physical activityand built environment (PABE) studies the environmental-behaviour relationships butdoesn’t offer yet design principles to facilitate the planning of running facilities. In thispaper we present design principles derived from crowdsourced data to improve the spatialconditions of urban public space for running. The crowdsourced data of 110.000 runningactivities from mobile Apps ( Strava, Runkeeper) have been analysed to gain insight inspatial behaviour of runners and spatial requirements that determine this behaviour. Thedata is gathered for Amsterdam, The Netherlands. Differences of running locations arestudied taking into consideration a variety of target groups (long and short distancerunners), times (light and dark hours, days of the week) and physical conditions (outdoortemperatures). The findings of the crowdsourced analysis is verified by on-site surveys inwhich runners were questioned to explain their spatial experiences during running. Designprinciples were derived from the analysis results and its verification and applied on twolocations of Amsterdam. The derived principles show planning options for a more runnerfriendly city consisting of slow traffic networks that are well recognizable, uninterrupted,with clear start-stop locations and certain distances. Discussion of the pros and cons of thiscrowdsourced data approach finalizes the paper.

M3 - Abstract

ER -

Dolders T, Reiling M, Brinkhuisen M, van Lammeren RJA. Designing a runner friendly city. The role of crowdsourced data in urban landscape design. 2016. Abstract from International Conference urban e-planning: recent developments, emerging issues and future challenges, Lisbon, Portugal.