Design of aqueous two-phase systems supporting animal cell growth: a first step toward extractive bioconversions.

G.M. Zijlstra, C.D. de Gooijer, L.A. van der Pol, J. Tramper

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Abstract

The design of aqueous two-phase systems (ATPSs) which support the long-term growth of animal cells is described in this paper. It was found that the increase in osmolality caused by the ATPS-forming polymers could be compensated by reducing the NaCl concentration of the culture medium. Cell growth was possible in culture media containing up to 0.025 g g-1 PEG or 0.15 g g-1 dextran. In ATPSs of PEG 35,000; dextran 40,000; and culture medium; the hybridoma cells partitioned to the PEG-lean phase. In two of these ATPSs, hybridoma cells were successfully cultured over a period of more than two months. The Mab product, however, partitioned along with the cells in the lower phase, but preliminary experiments using PEG ligands showed improved Mab partitioning. The design of aqueous two-phase systems (ATPSs) which support the long-term growth of animal cells is described in this paper. It was found that the increase in osmolality caused by the ATPS-forming polymers could be compensated by reducing the NaCl concentration of the culture medium. Cell growth was possible in culture media containing up to 0.025 g g-1 PEG or 0.15 g g-1 dextran. In ATPSs of PEG 35,000; dextran 40,000; and culture medium; the hybridoma cells partitioned to the PEG-lean phase. In two of these ATPSs, hybridoma cells were successfully cultured over a period of more than two months. The Mab product, however, partitioned along with the cells in the lower phase, but preliminary experiments using PEG ligands showed improved Mab partitioning.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)2-8
JournalEnzyme and Microbial Technology
Volume19
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1996

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