Decreased preference and reproduction, and increased mortality of Frankliniella occidentalis on thrips-resistant pepper plants

P.C. Maris, N.N. Joosten, R.W. Goldbach, D. Peters

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleAcademicpeer-review

20 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The effect of thrips resistance in pepper (Capsicum annuum L.) - previously shown to result in impeded thrips population development (Maris PC, Joosten NN, Goldbach RW & Peters D (2003a) Restricted spread of Tomato spotted wilt virus in thrips-resistant pepper. Phytopathology 93: 1223-1227. Maris PC, Joosten NN, Goldbach RW & Peters D (2003b) Spread of Tomato spotted wilt virus and population development of Frankliniella occidentalis in pepper resistant to thrips. Proceedings of the Section Experimental and Applied Entomology Netherlands Entomological Society (NEV) Amsterdam 14: 95-101.) - on thrips'[Frankliniella occidentalis Pergande (Thysanoptera: Thripidae)] reproduction, mortality, host preference, and behaviour was investigated. Reproduction, studied by oviposition and larval survival, was negatively affected by the thrips-resistant (TR) phenotype, whereas the offspring's developmental rate did not differ on TR and the thrips-susceptible (TS) phenotype. While thrips' behaviour was hardly affected by thrips resistance, a significant preference for TS plants over the TR plants was found in different tests. When released on either a TR or a TS plant, thrips dispersed at significantly higher rates from the TR plants, demonstrating that not only an impeded reproduction, but also a reduced residence time adds to the reported lower thrips numbers on TR plants.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)149-155
Number of pages7
JournalEntomologia Experimentalis et Applicata
Volume113
Issue number3
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2004

Keywords

  • western flower thrips
  • spotted-wilt-virus
  • thysanoptera
  • tospoviruses
  • cultivar

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