Deciphering landscapes through the lenses of locals: The “Territorial Social-Ecological Networks” Framework applied to a Brazilian maroon case

Fernanda Ayaviri Matuk*, Jelle Behagel, Carlos Ernesto Gonçalves Reynaud Schaefer, Reinaldo Duque-Brasil, Esther Turnhout

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleAcademicpeer-review

Abstract

Landscape approaches are prominent in current policy debates about how to achieve ecological, economic and social sustainability. These approaches assess local social-ecological contexts to plan adaptive management and often include indigenous peoples and local communities (IPLC). An important aim of landscape approaches is to integrate different scientific disciplines, indigenous and local knowledge systems (ILK) and Western science, and global and local needs. In practice, such integration tends to favor globalized knowledge models and global needs over local ones. This article introduces a Territorial Social-Ecological Networks (TSEN) Framework for an integrated assessment of landscape settings and dynamics to overcome such tendencies. We argue that both scientific knowledge and ILK are entwined with practice and informed by worldviews. Moreover, these assemblages of knowledges-practice-worldviews are produced by social and ecological interrelations (or networks) that shape human appropriation of territory. We use an approach of methodological bricolage to apply the TSEN Framework to the case of the Brazilian Malhada Grande Maroon Territory. The results highlight how social-ecological networks of different space-time scales co-produce landscapes. Trade-offs and synergies between global and local needs are also discussed and used to identify priority needs that can be addressed by a landscape approach in the area. The analysis suggests that the TSEN Framework may be used by both scientists and practitioners to perform environmental assessments that are inclusive of social and ecological disciplines, of local and Western scientific knowledge, and of global and local needs in a landscape.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)101-115
JournalGeoforum
Volume100
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Mar 2019

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worldview
knowledge
scientific discipline
synergy
sustainability
science
management
community
economics
time

Keywords

  • Adaptive co-management
  • Indigenous and local knowledge systems
  • Integration
  • Landscape approaches
  • Social-ecological systems
  • Territory

Cite this

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title = "Deciphering landscapes through the lenses of locals: The “Territorial Social-Ecological Networks” Framework applied to a Brazilian maroon case",
abstract = "Landscape approaches are prominent in current policy debates about how to achieve ecological, economic and social sustainability. These approaches assess local social-ecological contexts to plan adaptive management and often include indigenous peoples and local communities (IPLC). An important aim of landscape approaches is to integrate different scientific disciplines, indigenous and local knowledge systems (ILK) and Western science, and global and local needs. In practice, such integration tends to favor globalized knowledge models and global needs over local ones. This article introduces a Territorial Social-Ecological Networks (TSEN) Framework for an integrated assessment of landscape settings and dynamics to overcome such tendencies. We argue that both scientific knowledge and ILK are entwined with practice and informed by worldviews. Moreover, these assemblages of knowledges-practice-worldviews are produced by social and ecological interrelations (or networks) that shape human appropriation of territory. We use an approach of methodological bricolage to apply the TSEN Framework to the case of the Brazilian Malhada Grande Maroon Territory. The results highlight how social-ecological networks of different space-time scales co-produce landscapes. Trade-offs and synergies between global and local needs are also discussed and used to identify priority needs that can be addressed by a landscape approach in the area. The analysis suggests that the TSEN Framework may be used by both scientists and practitioners to perform environmental assessments that are inclusive of social and ecological disciplines, of local and Western scientific knowledge, and of global and local needs in a landscape.",
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Deciphering landscapes through the lenses of locals: The “Territorial Social-Ecological Networks” Framework applied to a Brazilian maroon case. / Ayaviri Matuk, Fernanda; Behagel, Jelle; Gonçalves Reynaud Schaefer, Carlos Ernesto; Duque-Brasil, Reinaldo; Turnhout, Esther.

In: Geoforum, Vol. 100, 01.03.2019, p. 101-115.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleAcademicpeer-review

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T1 - Deciphering landscapes through the lenses of locals: The “Territorial Social-Ecological Networks” Framework applied to a Brazilian maroon case

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AU - Behagel, Jelle

AU - Gonçalves Reynaud Schaefer, Carlos Ernesto

AU - Duque-Brasil, Reinaldo

AU - Turnhout, Esther

PY - 2019/3/1

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ER -