Dairy shows different associations with abdominal and BMI-defined overweight: cross-sectional analyses exploring a variety of dairy products

E.M. Brouwer*, D. Sluik, C.M. Singh-Povel, E.J.M. Feskens

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleAcademicpeer-review

11 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background and aims: Previous studies suggest weight-regulatory properties for several dairy nutrients, but population-based studies on dairy and body weight are inconclusive. We explored cross-sectional associations between dairy consumption and indicators of overweight. Methods and results: We included 114 682 Dutch adults, aged ≥18y. Dairy consumption was quantified by a food frequency questionnaire. Abdominal overweight was defined as waist circumference (WC) ≥88 (women) or ≥102 (men) cm (n=37 391), overweight as BMI ≥25-30 kg/m2 (n=44 772), and obesity as BMI ≥30 kg/m2 (n=15 339). Associations were quantified by logistic (abdominal overweight, no/yes), multinomial logistic (BMI-defined overweight and obesity) and linear regression analyses (continuous measures of WC and BMI), and adjusted for relevant covariates. Total dairy was positively associated with abdominal overweight (OR Q1ref vs Q5: 1.09; 95% CI: 1.04, 1.14), and BMI-defined overweight (ORQ5 1.13; 95% CI: 1.08, 1.18) and obesity (ORQ5 1.09; 95% CI: 1.02, 1.16). Positive associations were also observed of skimmed, semi-skimmed, and non-fermented dairy with overweight categories. Full-fat dairy was inversely associated with overweight and obesity (ORQ5 for obesity: 0.78; 95% CI: 0.73, 0.83). Moreover, inverse associations were observed for yogurt and custard, and positive associations for milk, buttermilk, flavoured yogurt drinks, cheese, and cheese snacks. Fermented dairy, curd cheese and Dutch cheese were not consistently associated with overweight categories. Conclusions: Total, skimmed, semi-skimmed, and non-fermented dairy, milk, buttermilk, flavoured yogurt drinks, total cheese, and cheese snacks were positively associated with overweight categories, whereas full-fat dairy, custard, and yogurt were inversely associated with overweight categories.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)451-460
JournalNutrition, Metabolism & Cardiovascular Diseases
Volume28
Issue number5
Early online date30 Mar 2018
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - May 2018

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