Dairy proteins, dairy lipids, and postprandial lipemia in persons with abdominal obesity (DairyHealth): A 12-wk, randomized, parallel-controlled, double-blinded, diet intervention study

Mette Bohl*, Ann Bjørnshave, Kia V. Rasmussen, Anne Grethe Schioldan, Bashar Amer, Mette K. Larsen, Trine K. Dalsgaard, Jens J. Holst, Annkatrin Herrmann, Sadhbh O'Neill, Lorraine O'Driscoll, Lydia Afman, Erik Jensen, Merete M. Christensen, Søren Gregersen, Kjeld Hermansen

*Corresponding author for this work

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31 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: Abdominal obesity and exaggerated postprandial lipemia are independent risk factors for cardiovascular disease (CVD) and mortality, and both are affected by dietary behavior. Objective: We investigated whether dietary supplementation with whey protein and medium-chain saturated fatty acids (MC-SFAs) improved postprandial lipid metabolism in humans with abdominal obesity. Design: We conducted a 12-wk, randomized, double-blinded, diet intervention study. Sixty-three adults were randomly allocated to one of 4 diets in a 2 3 2 factorial design. Participants consumed 60 g milk protein (whey or casein) and 63 g milk fat (with high or low MCSFA content) daily. Before and after the intervention, a high-fat meal test was performed. We measured changes from baseline in fasting and postprandial triacylglycerol, apolipoprotein B-48 (apoB-48; reflecting chylomicrons of intestinal origin), free fatty acids (FFAs), insulin, glucose, glucagon, glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP-1), and gastric inhibitory polypeptide (GIP). Furthermore, changes in the expression of adipose tissue genes involved in lipid metabolism were investigated. Two-factor ANOVA was used to examine the difference between protein types and fatty acid compositions, as well as any interaction between the two. Results: Fifty-two participants completed the study. We found that the postprandial apoB-48 response decreased significantly after whey compared with casein (P = 0.025) independently of fatty acid composition. Furthermore, supplementation with casein resulted in a significant increase in the postprandial GLP-1 response compared with whey (P = 0.003). We found no difference in postprandial triacylglycerol, FFA, insulin, glucose, glucagon, or GIP related to protein type or MC-SFA content. We observed no interaction between milk protein and milk fat on postprandial lipemia. Conclusion: We found that a whey protein supplement decreased the postprandial chylomicron response compared with casein in persons with abdominal obesity, thereby indicating a beneficial impact on CVD risk.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)870-878
JournalAmerican Journal of Clinical Nutrition
Volume101
Issue number4
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2015

Keywords

  • Abdominal obesity
  • Adipose tissue gene expression
  • ApoB-48
  • Casein
  • Dairy
  • Incretin
  • Mediumchain saturated fatty acid
  • Milk fat
  • Milk protein
  • Postprandial lipemia
  • Whey

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    Bohl, M., Bjørnshave, A., Rasmussen, K. V., Schioldan, A. G., Amer, B., Larsen, M. K., Dalsgaard, T. K., Holst, J. J., Herrmann, A., O'Neill, S., O'Driscoll, L., Afman, L., Jensen, E., Christensen, M. M., Gregersen, S., & Hermansen, K. (2015). Dairy proteins, dairy lipids, and postprandial lipemia in persons with abdominal obesity (DairyHealth): A 12-wk, randomized, parallel-controlled, double-blinded, diet intervention study. American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, 101(4), 870-878. https://doi.org/10.3945/ajcn.114.097923