Cultural bequest values for ecosystem service flows among indigenous fishers: A discrete choice experiment validated with mixed methods

K.L.L. Oleson, M. Barnes, L. Brander, T.A. Olvier, I.J.M. van Beek, B. Zafindrasilivonona, P. Beukering

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42 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Perhaps the most understudied ecosystem services are related to socio-cultural values tied to non-material benefits arising from human–ecosystem relationships. Bequest values linked to natural ecosystems can be particularly significant for indigenous communities whose livelihoods and cultures are tied to ecosystems. Here we apply a discrete choice experiment (DCE) to determine indigenous fishers' preferences and willingness-to-pay for bequest gains from management actions in a locally managed marine area in Madagascar, and use our results to estimate an implicit discount rate. We validate our results using a unique rating and ranking game and other mixed methods. We find that bequest is highly valued and important; respondents were willing to pay a substantial portion of their income to protect ecosystems for future generations. Through all of our inquiries, bequest emerged as the highest priority, even when respondents were forced to make trade-offs among other livelihood-supporting ecosystem services. This study is among a relative few to quantify bequest values and apply a DCE to model trade-offs, value ecosystem service flows, and estimate discount rates in a developing country. Our results directly inform coastal management in Madagascar and elsewhere by providing information on the socio-cultural value of bequest in comparison to other ecosystem service benefits
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)104-116
JournalEcological Economics
Volume114
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2015

Fingerprint

ecosystem service
discount rate
ecosystem
experiment
willingness to pay
coastal zone management
ranking
developing world
income
method
Bequests
Ecosystem services
Discrete choice experiment
Mixed methods
livelihood
Ecosystem
Madagascar
Trade-offs
Discount rate
Cultural values

Cite this

Oleson, K. L. L., Barnes, M., Brander, L., Olvier, T. A., van Beek, I. J. M., Zafindrasilivonona, B., & Beukering, P. (2015). Cultural bequest values for ecosystem service flows among indigenous fishers: A discrete choice experiment validated with mixed methods. Ecological Economics, 114, 104-116. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.ecolecon.2015.02.028
Oleson, K.L.L. ; Barnes, M. ; Brander, L. ; Olvier, T.A. ; van Beek, I.J.M. ; Zafindrasilivonona, B. ; Beukering, P. / Cultural bequest values for ecosystem service flows among indigenous fishers: A discrete choice experiment validated with mixed methods. In: Ecological Economics. 2015 ; Vol. 114. pp. 104-116.
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Oleson, KLL, Barnes, M, Brander, L, Olvier, TA, van Beek, IJM, Zafindrasilivonona, B & Beukering, P 2015, 'Cultural bequest values for ecosystem service flows among indigenous fishers: A discrete choice experiment validated with mixed methods', Ecological Economics, vol. 114, pp. 104-116. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.ecolecon.2015.02.028

Cultural bequest values for ecosystem service flows among indigenous fishers: A discrete choice experiment validated with mixed methods. / Oleson, K.L.L.; Barnes, M.; Brander, L.; Olvier, T.A.; van Beek, I.J.M.; Zafindrasilivonona, B.; Beukering, P.

In: Ecological Economics, Vol. 114, 2015, p. 104-116.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleAcademicpeer-review

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