Cruise tourism in iceland and the north atlantic: Gateways to the arctic and the challenges to port readiness programs

Edward H. Huijbens*

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleAcademicpeer-review

13 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

This article details the findings of research undertaken on cruise ship operations around Iceland and in the North Atlantic in the year 2013 and until the end of the summer season 2014. The focus of the research was on the socioeconomic impact of cruise ship arrivals on small and/or peripheral destinations in Iceland, set within the context of cruise tourism development in the North Atlantic and the Arctic more broadly. The article details who can expect to receive benefits from cruise ship arrivals in a peripheral destination in Iceland. The findings demonstrate that Iceland is largely dependent on big cruise ships for the accrued benefit, yet opportunities exist for smaller harbors to cater to expedition-type vessels, vessels that are indeed doing arctic exploration, and Iceland could function as the gateway harbor, with well-developed infrastructure for these purposes.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)241-254
Number of pages14
JournalTourism in Marine Environments
Volume10
Issue number3-4
Publication statusPublished - 1 Jan 2015
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • Arctic
  • Cruise tourism
  • Gateway
  • Iceland
  • Port readiness

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'Cruise tourism in iceland and the north atlantic: Gateways to the arctic and the challenges to port readiness programs'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this