Costs and reliability of livestock traceability systems for the Dutch sheep and goat sectors

A.G.J. Velthuis, H. Hogeveen, M.C.M. Mourits, M.A. Dolman, H. Wichen, A. Gaaff

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleAcademicpeer-review

Abstract

The costs and reliability of two electronic identification and registration (I&R) systems for sheep and goats were estimated and compared to the current I&R system in the Dutch sheep and goat sectors. In the current system (farm individual registration or FIR), animals are identified with ear tags with an individual animal number, unique farm number and registered on-farm. In the central individual registration (CIR) system animals are identified with electronic ear tags and registered individually in a central database. In the central group registration (CGR) system animals are identified with electronic ear tags and registered individually on-farm, while group movements are registered in a central database. The net costs for the FIR system were 2.6 and 1.2 million Euros per year for sheep and goats, respectively. These net costs increased to a total of 11.8 and 6.0 million Euros per year for the CIR system and to 13.5 and 6.8 million Euros per year for the CGR system. The expected percentages of incorrect registrations were equal to an average of 7.2% and 3.4% for FIR and CIR, respectively, and a lower limit of 7.6% for CGR
LanguageEnglish
Pages31-42
JournalActa Agriculturae Scandinavica. Section C Food Economics
Volume6
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2009

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traceability
ear tags
livestock
goats
sheep
farms
electronics
animals
electronic identification
farm numbers

Cite this

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title = "Costs and reliability of livestock traceability systems for the Dutch sheep and goat sectors",
abstract = "The costs and reliability of two electronic identification and registration (I&R) systems for sheep and goats were estimated and compared to the current I&R system in the Dutch sheep and goat sectors. In the current system (farm individual registration or FIR), animals are identified with ear tags with an individual animal number, unique farm number and registered on-farm. In the central individual registration (CIR) system animals are identified with electronic ear tags and registered individually in a central database. In the central group registration (CGR) system animals are identified with electronic ear tags and registered individually on-farm, while group movements are registered in a central database. The net costs for the FIR system were 2.6 and 1.2 million Euros per year for sheep and goats, respectively. These net costs increased to a total of 11.8 and 6.0 million Euros per year for the CIR system and to 13.5 and 6.8 million Euros per year for the CGR system. The expected percentages of incorrect registrations were equal to an average of 7.2{\%} and 3.4{\%} for FIR and CIR, respectively, and a lower limit of 7.6{\%} for CGR",
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Costs and reliability of livestock traceability systems for the Dutch sheep and goat sectors. / Velthuis, A.G.J.; Hogeveen, H.; Mourits, M.C.M.; Dolman, M.A.; Wichen, H.; Gaaff, A.

In: Acta Agriculturae Scandinavica. Section C Food Economics, Vol. 6, No. 1, 2009, p. 31-42.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleAcademicpeer-review

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