Cooking, industrial processing and caloric density of foods

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleAcademicpeer-review

6 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

During human evolution, the development of a wide range of cooking processing techniques enabled humans to provide their social group with maximum benefits from limited food resources. Industrial processing and mass market distribution made available high food calorie density foods to the world population boosting the developing of obesity. Western diet are very much in line with human evolutionary heritage because foods are soft, easy to chew, with a high content of fat and free sugar. The same processing technologies, which created high-calorie dense foods, should also be used in other ways to design products that are still appealing, tasteful and palatable, but do not provide an excess of energy.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)98-102
JournalCurrent Opinion in Food Science
Volume14
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2017

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Cooking
processing technology
cooking
Food
foodways
obesity
lipid content
markets
sugars
energy
Obesity
Fats
Technology
Population
methodology

Cite this

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title = "Cooking, industrial processing and caloric density of foods",
abstract = "During human evolution, the development of a wide range of cooking processing techniques enabled humans to provide their social group with maximum benefits from limited food resources. Industrial processing and mass market distribution made available high food calorie density foods to the world population boosting the developing of obesity. Western diet are very much in line with human evolutionary heritage because foods are soft, easy to chew, with a high content of fat and free sugar. The same processing technologies, which created high-calorie dense foods, should also be used in other ways to design products that are still appealing, tasteful and palatable, but do not provide an excess of energy.",
author = "Nicoletta Pellegrini and Vincenzo Fogliano",
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Cooking, industrial processing and caloric density of foods. / Pellegrini, Nicoletta; Fogliano, Vincenzo.

In: Current Opinion in Food Science, Vol. 14, 2017, p. 98-102.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleAcademicpeer-review

TY - JOUR

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AU - Fogliano, Vincenzo

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AB - During human evolution, the development of a wide range of cooking processing techniques enabled humans to provide their social group with maximum benefits from limited food resources. Industrial processing and mass market distribution made available high food calorie density foods to the world population boosting the developing of obesity. Western diet are very much in line with human evolutionary heritage because foods are soft, easy to chew, with a high content of fat and free sugar. The same processing technologies, which created high-calorie dense foods, should also be used in other ways to design products that are still appealing, tasteful and palatable, but do not provide an excess of energy.

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DO - 10.1016/j.cofs.2017.02.006

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JO - Current Opinion in Food Science

JF - Current Opinion in Food Science

SN - 2214-7993

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