Contribution of Eat1 and other alcohol acyltransferases to ester production in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

A.J. Kruis, Brigida Gallone, T. Jonker, A.E. Mars, I.M.H. van Rijswijck, J.C.M. Wolkers-Rooijackers, E.J. Smid, Jan Steensels, Kevin J. Verstrepen, S.W.M. Kengen, J. van der Oost, R.A. Weusthuis

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleAcademicpeer-review

Abstract

Esters are essential for the flavor and aroma of fermented products, and are mainly produced by alcohol acyl transferases (AATs). A recently discovered AAT family named Eat (Ethanol acetyltransferase) contributes to ethyl acetate synthesis in yeast. However, its effect on the synthesis of other esters is unknown. In this study, the role of the Eat family in ester synthesis was compared to that of other Saccharomyces cerevisiae AATs (Atf1p, Atf2p, Eht1p, and Eeb1p) in silico and in vivo. A genomic study in a collection of industrial S. cerevisiae strains showed that variation of the primary sequence of the AATs did not correlate with ester production. Fifteen members of the EAT family from nine yeast species were overexpressed in S. cerevisiae CEN.PK2-1D and were able to increase the production of acetate and propanoate esters. The role of Eat1p was then studied in more detail in S. cerevisiae CEN.PK2-1D by deleting EAT1 in various combinations with other known S. cerevisiae AATs. Between 6 and 11 esters were produced under three cultivation conditions. Contrary to our expectations, a strain where all known AATs were disrupted could still produce, e.g., ethyl acetate and isoamyl acetate. This study has expanded our understanding of ester synthesis in yeast but also showed that some unknown ester-producing mechanisms still exist.
LanguageEnglish
Article number3202
Number of pages11
JournalFrontiers in Microbiology
Volume9
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 21 Dec 2018

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Acyltransferases
Saccharomyces cerevisiae
Esters
Transferases
Alcohols
Acetyltransferases
Yeasts
Ethanol
Propionates
Computer Simulation
Acetates

Cite this

@article{c3ac09c4b15241de8d9110e30660a0a5,
title = "Contribution of Eat1 and other alcohol acyltransferases to ester production in Saccharomyces cerevisiae",
abstract = "Esters are essential for the flavor and aroma of fermented products, and are mainly produced by alcohol acyl transferases (AATs). A recently discovered AAT family named Eat (Ethanol acetyltransferase) contributes to ethyl acetate synthesis in yeast. However, its effect on the synthesis of other esters is unknown. In this study, the role of the Eat family in ester synthesis was compared to that of other Saccharomyces cerevisiae AATs (Atf1p, Atf2p, Eht1p, and Eeb1p) in silico and in vivo. A genomic study in a collection of industrial S. cerevisiae strains showed that variation of the primary sequence of the AATs did not correlate with ester production. Fifteen members of the EAT family from nine yeast species were overexpressed in S. cerevisiae CEN.PK2-1D and were able to increase the production of acetate and propanoate esters. The role of Eat1p was then studied in more detail in S. cerevisiae CEN.PK2-1D by deleting EAT1 in various combinations with other known S. cerevisiae AATs. Between 6 and 11 esters were produced under three cultivation conditions. Contrary to our expectations, a strain where all known AATs were disrupted could still produce, e.g., ethyl acetate and isoamyl acetate. This study has expanded our understanding of ester synthesis in yeast but also showed that some unknown ester-producing mechanisms still exist.",
author = "A.J. Kruis and Brigida Gallone and T. Jonker and A.E. Mars and {van Rijswijck}, I.M.H. and J.C.M. Wolkers-Rooijackers and E.J. Smid and Jan Steensels and Verstrepen, {Kevin J.} and S.W.M. Kengen and {van der Oost}, J. and R.A. Weusthuis",
year = "2018",
month = "12",
day = "21",
doi = "10.3389/fmicb.2018.03202",
language = "English",
volume = "9",
journal = "Frontiers in Microbiology",
issn = "1664-302X",
publisher = "Frontiers",

}

Contribution of Eat1 and other alcohol acyltransferases to ester production in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. / Kruis, A.J.; Gallone, Brigida; Jonker, T.; Mars, A.E.; van Rijswijck, I.M.H.; Wolkers-Rooijackers, J.C.M.; Smid, E.J.; Steensels, Jan; Verstrepen, Kevin J.; Kengen, S.W.M.; van der Oost, J.; Weusthuis, R.A.

In: Frontiers in Microbiology, Vol. 9, 3202, 21.12.2018.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleAcademicpeer-review

TY - JOUR

T1 - Contribution of Eat1 and other alcohol acyltransferases to ester production in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

AU - Kruis, A.J.

AU - Gallone, Brigida

AU - Jonker, T.

AU - Mars, A.E.

AU - van Rijswijck, I.M.H.

AU - Wolkers-Rooijackers, J.C.M.

AU - Smid, E.J.

AU - Steensels, Jan

AU - Verstrepen, Kevin J.

AU - Kengen, S.W.M.

AU - van der Oost, J.

AU - Weusthuis, R.A.

PY - 2018/12/21

Y1 - 2018/12/21

N2 - Esters are essential for the flavor and aroma of fermented products, and are mainly produced by alcohol acyl transferases (AATs). A recently discovered AAT family named Eat (Ethanol acetyltransferase) contributes to ethyl acetate synthesis in yeast. However, its effect on the synthesis of other esters is unknown. In this study, the role of the Eat family in ester synthesis was compared to that of other Saccharomyces cerevisiae AATs (Atf1p, Atf2p, Eht1p, and Eeb1p) in silico and in vivo. A genomic study in a collection of industrial S. cerevisiae strains showed that variation of the primary sequence of the AATs did not correlate with ester production. Fifteen members of the EAT family from nine yeast species were overexpressed in S. cerevisiae CEN.PK2-1D and were able to increase the production of acetate and propanoate esters. The role of Eat1p was then studied in more detail in S. cerevisiae CEN.PK2-1D by deleting EAT1 in various combinations with other known S. cerevisiae AATs. Between 6 and 11 esters were produced under three cultivation conditions. Contrary to our expectations, a strain where all known AATs were disrupted could still produce, e.g., ethyl acetate and isoamyl acetate. This study has expanded our understanding of ester synthesis in yeast but also showed that some unknown ester-producing mechanisms still exist.

AB - Esters are essential for the flavor and aroma of fermented products, and are mainly produced by alcohol acyl transferases (AATs). A recently discovered AAT family named Eat (Ethanol acetyltransferase) contributes to ethyl acetate synthesis in yeast. However, its effect on the synthesis of other esters is unknown. In this study, the role of the Eat family in ester synthesis was compared to that of other Saccharomyces cerevisiae AATs (Atf1p, Atf2p, Eht1p, and Eeb1p) in silico and in vivo. A genomic study in a collection of industrial S. cerevisiae strains showed that variation of the primary sequence of the AATs did not correlate with ester production. Fifteen members of the EAT family from nine yeast species were overexpressed in S. cerevisiae CEN.PK2-1D and were able to increase the production of acetate and propanoate esters. The role of Eat1p was then studied in more detail in S. cerevisiae CEN.PK2-1D by deleting EAT1 in various combinations with other known S. cerevisiae AATs. Between 6 and 11 esters were produced under three cultivation conditions. Contrary to our expectations, a strain where all known AATs were disrupted could still produce, e.g., ethyl acetate and isoamyl acetate. This study has expanded our understanding of ester synthesis in yeast but also showed that some unknown ester-producing mechanisms still exist.

U2 - 10.3389/fmicb.2018.03202

DO - 10.3389/fmicb.2018.03202

M3 - Article

VL - 9

JO - Frontiers in Microbiology

T2 - Frontiers in Microbiology

JF - Frontiers in Microbiology

SN - 1664-302X

M1 - 3202

ER -