Considering the ways biocultural diversity helps enforce the urban green infrastructure in times of urban transformation

Kati Vierikko, B.H.M. Elands, J. Niemela, Erik Andersson, A.E. Buijs, Leonie Katharina Fischer, Dagmar Haase, Ingo Kowarik, Nadja Kabisch, Ana Catarina Luz, Anton Olafsson Stahl, Luca Száraz, Alexander van der Jagt, Cecil Konijnendijk van den Bosch

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleAcademicpeer-review

22 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Traditionally, biocultural diversity (BCD) has been researched in non-western and indigenous societies. Recently, it has also been applied in urbanized and industrialized societies, in particular for the planning and management of urban green infrastructure (UGI). Diversity in human and biological systems is considered to support cities’ adaptation capacity. However, diversity might also increase the risk of conflicts. In this paper, we discuss not only how the BCD approach could strengthen studies on human–nature interactions in an urban context, but also the potential pitfalls of applying BCD. By means of two examples of BCD research, that is people in-places and people-making UGI in cities, we argue that BCD as a reflexive concept can strengthen UGI planning and management.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)7-12
JournalCurrent Opinion in Environmental Sustainability
Volume22
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2017

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