Consequences of transition treatments on fertility and associated metabolic status for dairy cows in early lactation

Junnan Ma, Renny J. van Hoeij, Rupert M. Bruckmaier, Akke Kok, Theo J.G.M. Lam, Bas Kemp, Ariette T.M. van Knegsel*

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleAcademicpeer-review

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

This study aimed to (1) investigate effects of reducing postpartum dietary energy level for cows after a 0‐d dry period (DP) on resumption of ovarian cyclicity and reproductive performance, (2) relate days open with other reproductive measures, and (3) relate onset of luteal activity (OLA) and days open with metabolic status in early lactation. Holstein‐Friesian dairy cows were randomly assigned to 1 of 3 transition treatments: no DP and low postpartum dietary energy level from 22 days in milk(DIM)onwards (0‐d DP (LOW)) (n = 42), no DP and standard postpartum dietary energy level (0‐d DP (STD)) (n = 43), and a short DP and standard postpartum dietary energy level (30‐d DP (STD)) (n = 43). Milk progesterone concentration was determined three times per week until 100 DIM. Plasma metabolite and hormone concentrations were measured weekly until week 7 postpartum. Reducing postpartum dietary energy level in older cows (parity ≥ 3) after no DP and 22 DIM did not affect milk production but prevented a positive energy balance and shortened the interval from calving to OLA. In addition, services per pregnancy and days open were reduced in cows of parity ≥ 3 on 0‐d DP (LOW), compared with cows of parity ≥ 3 with 0‐d DP (STD), but not in cows of parity 2.

Original languageEnglish
Article number1100
Pages (from-to)1-21
Number of pages21
JournalAnimals
Volume10
Issue number6
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 25 Jun 2020

Keywords

  • Dietary energy level
  • Dry period length
  • Metabolic status
  • Ovarian activity

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