Confirming the species-sensitivity distribution concept for endosulfan using laboratory, mesocosm, and field data

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Abstract

In Australia, water-quality trigger values for toxicants are derived using protective concentration values based on species-sensitivity distribution (SSD) curves. SSD curves are generally derived from laboratory data with an emphasis on using local or site-specific data. In this study, Australian and non-Australian laboratory-species based SSD curves were compared and the concept of species protection confirmed by comparison of laboratory-based SSD curves with local mesocosm experiments and field monitoring data. Acute LC50 data for the organochlorine pesticide endosulfan were used for these comparisons; SSD curves were fitted using the Burr type III distribution. SSD curves indicated that the sensitivities of Australian fish and arthropods were not significantly different from those of corresponding non-Australian taxa. Arthropod taxa in the mesocosm were less sensitive than taxa in laboratory tests, which suggests that laboratory-generated single-species data may be used to predict concentrations protective of semifield (mesocosm) systems. SSDs based on laboratory data were also protective of field populations.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)511-520
JournalArchives of Environmental Contamination and Toxicology
Volume47
Issue number4
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2004

Keywords

  • ecological risk-assessment
  • namoi river
  • toxicity
  • water
  • fish
  • pesticides
  • australia
  • sediment

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