Comparison of a Canadian and a Dutch strain of the parasitoid Aphelinus mali (Hald) (Hym., Aphelinidae) for control of woolly apple aphid Eriosoma lanigerum (Haussmann) (Hom., Aphididae) in the Netherlands: a simulation approach

P.J.M. Mols, J.M. Boers

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleAcademicpeer-review

15 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Woolly apple aphid, Eriosoma lanigerum is one of the important apple pests in the Netherlands. Weather conditions and natural enemies determine whether woolly apple aphid (WAA) will reach pest status. WAA may escape control by natural enemies and therefore it must be controlled using chemical insecticides. To prevent unnecessary applications of insecticides and to promote biological and natural control of WAA more knowledge is needed about the role of natural enemies, weather and their effects on the development of WAA populations. The monophagous parasitoid Aphelinus mali (Hald.) has been introduced into most of apple growing areas to control WAA, but success is variable and depends on climatological conditions. In the Netherlands the level of parasitization is often too low, especially after warm winters. The biological control potential of a strain of A. mali from Nova Scotia (Canada) was compared with a Dutch strain by simulating population growth of both WAA and the Dutch and Canadian strain of the parasitoid for three different years The results indicate that the Canadian strain would perform in general better than the Dutch strain under Dutch weather conditions.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)255-262
JournalJournal of Applied Entomology
Volume125
Issue number5
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2001

Keywords

  • pieris-rapae
  • host
  • requirements
  • temperature
  • fecundity
  • size

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