Comparison of 1D PDA sampling methods to obtain drop size and velocity distributions inside a spray cone of agricultural nozzles

    Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference paperAcademic

    Abstract

    In agriculture, spray drift research is carried out in field experiments and by computer simulation. Regarding the latter approach, accurate knowledge of the initial spray is required. Not only is the overall drop size distribution of the spray an important factor in the spraying process, but also its local variation within the spray cone below a nozzle. Furthermore, the velocity distribution of drops in the spray cone has to be considered, which is a function of drop size and location in the spray cone. A PDA system is well-suited to carry out measurements on drop size and velocity. This study compares four scanning methods using a 1D PDA system to characterize the spray cone of a flat fan nozzle. These methods differ in operator time and handlings during the measurement and data processing afterwards. Fortunately, all methods give similar results so one is free to choose one’s preferred method. Although in some cases 2D or 3D PDA systems may be ideal, this study shows that a 1D system still offers possibilities for spray characterizations
    Original languageEnglish
    Title of host publicationLasermethoden in der Stromungsmesstechnik, Karlsruhe, Germany, 8 - 10 September, 2009
    EditorsA. Delgado, C. Rauh, H. Lienhart, B. Ruck, A. Leder, D. Dopheide
    Place of PublicationErlangen, Duitsland
    PublisherDeutsche Gesellschaft für Laser-Anemometrie GALA
    Pages35.1-35.8
    ISBN (Print)9783980561358
    Publication statusPublished - 2009
    EventLasermethoden in der Stromungsmesstechnik, Karlsruhe, Germany -
    Duration: 8 Sep 200910 Sep 2009

    Conference

    ConferenceLasermethoden in der Stromungsmesstechnik, Karlsruhe, Germany
    Period8/09/0910/09/09

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