Comparative Genomics of Campylobacter fetus from Reptilesand Mammals Reveals Divergent Evolution in Host-Associated Lineages

Maarten J. Gilbert, William G. Miller, Emma Yee, Aldert Zomer, Linda Van Der Graaf-Van Bloois, C. Fitzgerald, Ken J. Forbes, Guillaume Méric, S. Sheppard, J.A. Wagenaar, Birgitta Duim

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15 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Campylobacter fetus currently comprises three recognized subspecies, which display distinct host association. Campylobacter fetus subsp. fetus and C. fetus subsp. venerealis are both associated with endothermic mammals, primarily ruminants, whereas C. fetus subsp. testudinum is primarily associated with ectothermic reptiles. Both C. fetus subsp. testudinum and C. fetus subsp. fetus have been associated with severe infections, often with a systemic component, in immunocompromised humans. To study the genetic factors associated with the distinct host dichotomy in C. fetus, whole-genome sequencing and comparison of mammal- and reptile-associated C. fetus was performed. The genomes of C. fetus subsp. testudinum isolated from either reptiles or humans were compared with elucidate the genetic factors associated with pathogenicity in humans. Genomic comparisons showed conservation of gene content and organization among C. fetus subspecies, but a clear distinction between mammal- and reptile-associated C. fetus was observed. Several genomic regions appeared to be subspecies specific, including a putative tricarballylate catabolism pathway, exclusively present in C. fetus subsp. testudinum strains. Within C. fetus subsp. testudinum, sapA, sapB, and sapAB type strains were observed. The recombinant locus iamABC (mlaFED) was exclusively associated with invasive C. fetus subsp. testudinum strains isolated from humans. A phylogenetic reconstruction was consistent with divergent evolution in host-associated strains and the existence of a barrier to lateral gene transfer between mammal- and reptile-associated C. fetus. Overall, this study shows that reptile-associated C. fetus subsp. testudinum is genetically divergent from mammal-associated C. fetus subspecies.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)2006-2019
JournalGenome Biology and Evolution
Volume8
Issue number6
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2016

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Campylobacter fetus
divergent evolution
Genomics
reptile
Mammals
genomics
mammal
mammals
subspecies
Reptiles
reptiles
genome
Campylobacter fetus subsp. fetus
catabolism
gene transfer
ruminant
pathogenicity
Campylobacter fetus subsp. venerealis
phylogenetics
gene

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Gilbert, M. J., Miller, W. G., Yee, E., Zomer, A., Van Der Graaf-Van Bloois, L., Fitzgerald, C., ... Duim, B. (2016). Comparative Genomics of Campylobacter fetus from Reptilesand Mammals Reveals Divergent Evolution in Host-Associated Lineages. Genome Biology and Evolution, 8(6), 2006-2019. https://doi.org/10.1093/gbe/evw146
Gilbert, Maarten J. ; Miller, William G. ; Yee, Emma ; Zomer, Aldert ; Van Der Graaf-Van Bloois, Linda ; Fitzgerald, C. ; Forbes, Ken J. ; Méric, Guillaume ; Sheppard, S. ; Wagenaar, J.A. ; Duim, Birgitta. / Comparative Genomics of Campylobacter fetus from Reptilesand Mammals Reveals Divergent Evolution in Host-Associated Lineages. In: Genome Biology and Evolution. 2016 ; Vol. 8, No. 6. pp. 2006-2019.
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title = "Comparative Genomics of Campylobacter fetus from Reptilesand Mammals Reveals Divergent Evolution in Host-Associated Lineages",
abstract = "Campylobacter fetus currently comprises three recognized subspecies, which display distinct host association. Campylobacter fetus subsp. fetus and C. fetus subsp. venerealis are both associated with endothermic mammals, primarily ruminants, whereas C. fetus subsp. testudinum is primarily associated with ectothermic reptiles. Both C. fetus subsp. testudinum and C. fetus subsp. fetus have been associated with severe infections, often with a systemic component, in immunocompromised humans. To study the genetic factors associated with the distinct host dichotomy in C. fetus, whole-genome sequencing and comparison of mammal- and reptile-associated C. fetus was performed. The genomes of C. fetus subsp. testudinum isolated from either reptiles or humans were compared with elucidate the genetic factors associated with pathogenicity in humans. Genomic comparisons showed conservation of gene content and organization among C. fetus subspecies, but a clear distinction between mammal- and reptile-associated C. fetus was observed. Several genomic regions appeared to be subspecies specific, including a putative tricarballylate catabolism pathway, exclusively present in C. fetus subsp. testudinum strains. Within C. fetus subsp. testudinum, sapA, sapB, and sapAB type strains were observed. The recombinant locus iamABC (mlaFED) was exclusively associated with invasive C. fetus subsp. testudinum strains isolated from humans. A phylogenetic reconstruction was consistent with divergent evolution in host-associated strains and the existence of a barrier to lateral gene transfer between mammal- and reptile-associated C. fetus. Overall, this study shows that reptile-associated C. fetus subsp. testudinum is genetically divergent from mammal-associated C. fetus subspecies.",
author = "Gilbert, {Maarten J.} and Miller, {William G.} and Emma Yee and Aldert Zomer and {Van Der Graaf-Van Bloois}, Linda and C. Fitzgerald and Forbes, {Ken J.} and Guillaume M{\'e}ric and S. Sheppard and J.A. Wagenaar and Birgitta Duim",
year = "2016",
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Gilbert, MJ, Miller, WG, Yee, E, Zomer, A, Van Der Graaf-Van Bloois, L, Fitzgerald, C, Forbes, KJ, Méric, G, Sheppard, S, Wagenaar, JA & Duim, B 2016, 'Comparative Genomics of Campylobacter fetus from Reptilesand Mammals Reveals Divergent Evolution in Host-Associated Lineages' Genome Biology and Evolution, vol. 8, no. 6, pp. 2006-2019. https://doi.org/10.1093/gbe/evw146

Comparative Genomics of Campylobacter fetus from Reptilesand Mammals Reveals Divergent Evolution in Host-Associated Lineages. / Gilbert, Maarten J.; Miller, William G.; Yee, Emma; Zomer, Aldert; Van Der Graaf-Van Bloois, Linda; Fitzgerald, C.; Forbes, Ken J.; Méric, Guillaume; Sheppard, S.; Wagenaar, J.A.; Duim, Birgitta.

In: Genome Biology and Evolution, Vol. 8, No. 6, 2016, p. 2006-2019.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleAcademicpeer-review

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AU - Gilbert, Maarten J.

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AU - Zomer, Aldert

AU - Van Der Graaf-Van Bloois, Linda

AU - Fitzgerald, C.

AU - Forbes, Ken J.

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AU - Sheppard, S.

AU - Wagenaar, J.A.

AU - Duim, Birgitta

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AB - Campylobacter fetus currently comprises three recognized subspecies, which display distinct host association. Campylobacter fetus subsp. fetus and C. fetus subsp. venerealis are both associated with endothermic mammals, primarily ruminants, whereas C. fetus subsp. testudinum is primarily associated with ectothermic reptiles. Both C. fetus subsp. testudinum and C. fetus subsp. fetus have been associated with severe infections, often with a systemic component, in immunocompromised humans. To study the genetic factors associated with the distinct host dichotomy in C. fetus, whole-genome sequencing and comparison of mammal- and reptile-associated C. fetus was performed. The genomes of C. fetus subsp. testudinum isolated from either reptiles or humans were compared with elucidate the genetic factors associated with pathogenicity in humans. Genomic comparisons showed conservation of gene content and organization among C. fetus subspecies, but a clear distinction between mammal- and reptile-associated C. fetus was observed. Several genomic regions appeared to be subspecies specific, including a putative tricarballylate catabolism pathway, exclusively present in C. fetus subsp. testudinum strains. Within C. fetus subsp. testudinum, sapA, sapB, and sapAB type strains were observed. The recombinant locus iamABC (mlaFED) was exclusively associated with invasive C. fetus subsp. testudinum strains isolated from humans. A phylogenetic reconstruction was consistent with divergent evolution in host-associated strains and the existence of a barrier to lateral gene transfer between mammal- and reptile-associated C. fetus. Overall, this study shows that reptile-associated C. fetus subsp. testudinum is genetically divergent from mammal-associated C. fetus subspecies.

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JF - Genome Biology and Evolution

SN - 1759-6653

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