Companion Animals as a Source of Viruses for Human Beings and Food Production Animals

L.A. Reperant, I.H. Brown, O.L.M. Haenen, M.D. de Jong, Albert D.M.E. Osterhaus, A. Papa, E. Rimstad, J.F. Valarcher, T. Kuiken

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleAcademicpeer-review

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Abstract

Companion animals comprise a wide variety of species, including dogs, cats, horses, ferrets, guinea pigs, reptiles, birds and ornamental fish, as well as food production animal species, such as domestic pigs, kept as companion animals. Despite their prominent place in human society, little is known about the role of companion animals as sources of viruses for people and food production animals. Therefore, we reviewed the literature for accounts of infections of companion animals by zoonotic viruses and viruses of food production animals, and prioritized these viruses in terms of human health and economic importance. In total, 138 virus species reportedly capable of infecting companion animals were of concern for human and food production animal health: 59 of these viruses were infectious for human beings, 135 were infectious for food production mammals and birds, and 22 were infectious for food production fishes. Viruses of highest concern for human health included hantaviruses, Tahyna virus, rabies virus, West Nile virus, tick-borne encephalitis virus, Crimean–Congo haemorrhagic fever virus, Aichi virus, European bat lyssavirus, hepatitis E virus, cowpox virus, G5 rotavirus, influenza A virus and lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus. Viruses of highest concern for food production mammals and birds included bluetongue virus, African swine fever virus, foot-and-mouth disease virus, lumpy skin disease virus, Rift Valley fever virus, porcine circovirus, classical swine fever virus, equine herpesvirus 9, peste des petits ruminants virus and equine infectious anaemia virus. Viruses of highest concern for food production fishes included cyprinid herpesvirus 3 (koi herpesvirus), viral haemorrhagic septicaemia virus and infectious pancreatic necrosis virus. Of particular concern as sources of zoonotic or food production animal viruses were domestic carnivores, rodents and food production animals kept as companion animals. The current list of viruses provides an objective basis for more in-depth analysis of the risk of companion animals as sources of viruses for human and food production animal health
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)S41-S53
JournalJournal of Comparative Pathology
Volume155
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2016

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vertebrate viruses
Pets
animal production
pets
Viruses
Food
viruses
food production
Cyprinid herpesvirus 3
Herpesviridae
Birds
Fishes
animal health
Health
Zoonoses
Aichi virus
human health
Equid herpesvirus 9
birds
Lumpy skin disease virus

Cite this

Reperant, L. A., Brown, I. H., Haenen, O. L. M., de Jong, M. D., Osterhaus, A. D. M. E., Papa, A., ... Kuiken, T. (2016). Companion Animals as a Source of Viruses for Human Beings and Food Production Animals. Journal of Comparative Pathology, 155(1), S41-S53. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jcpa.2016.07.006
Reperant, L.A. ; Brown, I.H. ; Haenen, O.L.M. ; de Jong, M.D. ; Osterhaus, Albert D.M.E. ; Papa, A. ; Rimstad, E. ; Valarcher, J.F. ; Kuiken, T. / Companion Animals as a Source of Viruses for Human Beings and Food Production Animals. In: Journal of Comparative Pathology. 2016 ; Vol. 155, No. 1. pp. S41-S53.
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abstract = "Companion animals comprise a wide variety of species, including dogs, cats, horses, ferrets, guinea pigs, reptiles, birds and ornamental fish, as well as food production animal species, such as domestic pigs, kept as companion animals. Despite their prominent place in human society, little is known about the role of companion animals as sources of viruses for people and food production animals. Therefore, we reviewed the literature for accounts of infections of companion animals by zoonotic viruses and viruses of food production animals, and prioritized these viruses in terms of human health and economic importance. In total, 138 virus species reportedly capable of infecting companion animals were of concern for human and food production animal health: 59 of these viruses were infectious for human beings, 135 were infectious for food production mammals and birds, and 22 were infectious for food production fishes. Viruses of highest concern for human health included hantaviruses, Tahyna virus, rabies virus, West Nile virus, tick-borne encephalitis virus, Crimean–Congo haemorrhagic fever virus, Aichi virus, European bat lyssavirus, hepatitis E virus, cowpox virus, G5 rotavirus, influenza A virus and lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus. Viruses of highest concern for food production mammals and birds included bluetongue virus, African swine fever virus, foot-and-mouth disease virus, lumpy skin disease virus, Rift Valley fever virus, porcine circovirus, classical swine fever virus, equine herpesvirus 9, peste des petits ruminants virus and equine infectious anaemia virus. Viruses of highest concern for food production fishes included cyprinid herpesvirus 3 (koi herpesvirus), viral haemorrhagic septicaemia virus and infectious pancreatic necrosis virus. Of particular concern as sources of zoonotic or food production animal viruses were domestic carnivores, rodents and food production animals kept as companion animals. The current list of viruses provides an objective basis for more in-depth analysis of the risk of companion animals as sources of viruses for human and food production animal health",
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Reperant, LA, Brown, IH, Haenen, OLM, de Jong, MD, Osterhaus, ADME, Papa, A, Rimstad, E, Valarcher, JF & Kuiken, T 2016, 'Companion Animals as a Source of Viruses for Human Beings and Food Production Animals' Journal of Comparative Pathology, vol. 155, no. 1, pp. S41-S53. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jcpa.2016.07.006

Companion Animals as a Source of Viruses for Human Beings and Food Production Animals. / Reperant, L.A.; Brown, I.H.; Haenen, O.L.M.; de Jong, M.D.; Osterhaus, Albert D.M.E.; Papa, A.; Rimstad, E.; Valarcher, J.F.; Kuiken, T.

In: Journal of Comparative Pathology, Vol. 155, No. 1, 2016, p. S41-S53.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleAcademicpeer-review

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