Colorectal cancer survivors only marginally change their overall lifestyle in the first 2 years following diagnosis

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Abstract

Purpose: A healthy lifestyle after colorectal cancer (CRC) diagnosis may improve prognosis. Data related to lifestyle change in CRC survivors are inconsistent and potential interrelated changes are unknown. Methods: We assessed dietary intake, physical activity, body mass index (BMI), waist circumference, and smoking among 1072 patients diagnosed with stages I–III CRC at diagnosis, 6 months and 2 years post-diagnosis. An overall lifestyle score was constructed based on the 2018 World Cancer Research Fund/American Institute of Cancer Research recommendations (range 0–7). We used linear mixed models to analyze changes in lifestyle over time. Results: Participants had a mean (± SD) age of 65 ± 9 years and 43% had stage III disease. In the 2 years following CRC diagnosis, largest changes were noted for sugary drinks (− 45 g/day) and red and processed meat intake (− 62 g/week). BMI (+ 0.4 kg/m2), waist circumference (+ 2 cm), and dietary fiber intake (− 1 g/day) changed slightly. CRC survivors did not statistically significant change their mean intake of fruits and vegetables, alcohol, or ultra-processed foods nor did they change their physical activity or smoking behavior. Half of participants made simultaneous changes that resulted in improved concordance with one component as well as deteriorated concordance with another component of the lifestyle score. Overall lifestyle score changed from a mean 3.4 ± 0.9 at diagnosis to 3.5 ± 0.9 2 years post-diagnosis. Conclusions: CRC survivors hardly improve their overall lifestyle after diagnosis. Implications for Cancer Survivors: Given the importance of a healthy lifestyle, strategies to effectively support behavior changes in CRC survivors need to be identified.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)956-967
Number of pages12
JournalJournal of Cancer Survivorship
Volume13
Issue number6
Early online date23 Oct 2019
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Dec 2019

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Survivors
Life Style
Colorectal Neoplasms
Waist Circumference
Body Mass Index
Smoking
Exercise
Neoplasms
Dietary Fiber
Vegetables
Linear Models
Fruit
Alcohols
Food
Research

Keywords

  • Colorectal cancer
  • Dietary changes
  • Lifestyle changes
  • Lifestyle recommendations
  • Survivorship

Cite this

@article{c377879bba9a40688ca983110b6124dc,
title = "Colorectal cancer survivors only marginally change their overall lifestyle in the first 2 years following diagnosis",
abstract = "Purpose: A healthy lifestyle after colorectal cancer (CRC) diagnosis may improve prognosis. Data related to lifestyle change in CRC survivors are inconsistent and potential interrelated changes are unknown. Methods: We assessed dietary intake, physical activity, body mass index (BMI), waist circumference, and smoking among 1072 patients diagnosed with stages I–III CRC at diagnosis, 6 months and 2 years post-diagnosis. An overall lifestyle score was constructed based on the 2018 World Cancer Research Fund/American Institute of Cancer Research recommendations (range 0–7). We used linear mixed models to analyze changes in lifestyle over time. Results: Participants had a mean (± SD) age of 65 ± 9 years and 43{\%} had stage III disease. In the 2 years following CRC diagnosis, largest changes were noted for sugary drinks (− 45 g/day) and red and processed meat intake (− 62 g/week). BMI (+ 0.4 kg/m2), waist circumference (+ 2 cm), and dietary fiber intake (− 1 g/day) changed slightly. CRC survivors did not statistically significant change their mean intake of fruits and vegetables, alcohol, or ultra-processed foods nor did they change their physical activity or smoking behavior. Half of participants made simultaneous changes that resulted in improved concordance with one component as well as deteriorated concordance with another component of the lifestyle score. Overall lifestyle score changed from a mean 3.4 ± 0.9 at diagnosis to 3.5 ± 0.9 2 years post-diagnosis. Conclusions: CRC survivors hardly improve their overall lifestyle after diagnosis. Implications for Cancer Survivors: Given the importance of a healthy lifestyle, strategies to effectively support behavior changes in CRC survivors need to be identified.",
keywords = "Colorectal cancer, Dietary changes, Lifestyle changes, Lifestyle recommendations, Survivorship",
author = "{van Zutphen}, Moniek and Boshuizen, {Hendriek C.} and Kok, {Dieuwertje E.} and {van Baar}, Harm and Geijsen, {Anne J.M.R.} and Evertine Wesselink and Winkels, {Renate M.} and {van Halteren}, {Henk K.} and {de Wilt}, {Johannes H.W.} and Ellen Kampman and {van Duijnhoven}, {Fr{\"a}nzel J.B.}",
year = "2019",
month = "12",
doi = "10.1007/s11764-019-00812-7",
language = "English",
volume = "13",
pages = "956--967",
journal = "Journal of Cancer Survivorship",
issn = "1932-2259",
publisher = "Springer",
number = "6",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Colorectal cancer survivors only marginally change their overall lifestyle in the first 2 years following diagnosis

AU - van Zutphen, Moniek

AU - Boshuizen, Hendriek C.

AU - Kok, Dieuwertje E.

AU - van Baar, Harm

AU - Geijsen, Anne J.M.R.

AU - Wesselink, Evertine

AU - Winkels, Renate M.

AU - van Halteren, Henk K.

AU - de Wilt, Johannes H.W.

AU - Kampman, Ellen

AU - van Duijnhoven, Fränzel J.B.

PY - 2019/12

Y1 - 2019/12

N2 - Purpose: A healthy lifestyle after colorectal cancer (CRC) diagnosis may improve prognosis. Data related to lifestyle change in CRC survivors are inconsistent and potential interrelated changes are unknown. Methods: We assessed dietary intake, physical activity, body mass index (BMI), waist circumference, and smoking among 1072 patients diagnosed with stages I–III CRC at diagnosis, 6 months and 2 years post-diagnosis. An overall lifestyle score was constructed based on the 2018 World Cancer Research Fund/American Institute of Cancer Research recommendations (range 0–7). We used linear mixed models to analyze changes in lifestyle over time. Results: Participants had a mean (± SD) age of 65 ± 9 years and 43% had stage III disease. In the 2 years following CRC diagnosis, largest changes were noted for sugary drinks (− 45 g/day) and red and processed meat intake (− 62 g/week). BMI (+ 0.4 kg/m2), waist circumference (+ 2 cm), and dietary fiber intake (− 1 g/day) changed slightly. CRC survivors did not statistically significant change their mean intake of fruits and vegetables, alcohol, or ultra-processed foods nor did they change their physical activity or smoking behavior. Half of participants made simultaneous changes that resulted in improved concordance with one component as well as deteriorated concordance with another component of the lifestyle score. Overall lifestyle score changed from a mean 3.4 ± 0.9 at diagnosis to 3.5 ± 0.9 2 years post-diagnosis. Conclusions: CRC survivors hardly improve their overall lifestyle after diagnosis. Implications for Cancer Survivors: Given the importance of a healthy lifestyle, strategies to effectively support behavior changes in CRC survivors need to be identified.

AB - Purpose: A healthy lifestyle after colorectal cancer (CRC) diagnosis may improve prognosis. Data related to lifestyle change in CRC survivors are inconsistent and potential interrelated changes are unknown. Methods: We assessed dietary intake, physical activity, body mass index (BMI), waist circumference, and smoking among 1072 patients diagnosed with stages I–III CRC at diagnosis, 6 months and 2 years post-diagnosis. An overall lifestyle score was constructed based on the 2018 World Cancer Research Fund/American Institute of Cancer Research recommendations (range 0–7). We used linear mixed models to analyze changes in lifestyle over time. Results: Participants had a mean (± SD) age of 65 ± 9 years and 43% had stage III disease. In the 2 years following CRC diagnosis, largest changes were noted for sugary drinks (− 45 g/day) and red and processed meat intake (− 62 g/week). BMI (+ 0.4 kg/m2), waist circumference (+ 2 cm), and dietary fiber intake (− 1 g/day) changed slightly. CRC survivors did not statistically significant change their mean intake of fruits and vegetables, alcohol, or ultra-processed foods nor did they change their physical activity or smoking behavior. Half of participants made simultaneous changes that resulted in improved concordance with one component as well as deteriorated concordance with another component of the lifestyle score. Overall lifestyle score changed from a mean 3.4 ± 0.9 at diagnosis to 3.5 ± 0.9 2 years post-diagnosis. Conclusions: CRC survivors hardly improve their overall lifestyle after diagnosis. Implications for Cancer Survivors: Given the importance of a healthy lifestyle, strategies to effectively support behavior changes in CRC survivors need to be identified.

KW - Colorectal cancer

KW - Dietary changes

KW - Lifestyle changes

KW - Lifestyle recommendations

KW - Survivorship

U2 - 10.1007/s11764-019-00812-7

DO - 10.1007/s11764-019-00812-7

M3 - Article

VL - 13

SP - 956

EP - 967

JO - Journal of Cancer Survivorship

JF - Journal of Cancer Survivorship

SN - 1932-2259

IS - 6

ER -