Coil-globule transition for regular, random and specially designed copolymers: Monte Carlo simulation and self-consistent field theory

J.M.P. Oever, F.A.M. Leermakers, G.J. Fleer, V.A. Ivanov, N.P. Shusharina, A.R. Khokhlov, P.G. Khalatur

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleAcademicpeer-review

49 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The coil-globule transition has been studied for A-B copolymer chains both by means of lattice Monte Carlo (MC) simulations using bond fluctuation algorithm and by a numerical self-consistent-field (SCF) method. Copolymer chains of fixed length with A and B monomeric units with regular, random, and specially designed (proteinlike) primary sequences have been investigated. The dependence of the transition temperature on the AB sequence has been analyzed. A proteinlike copolymer is more stable than a copolymer with statistically random sequence. The transition is more sharp for random copolymers. It is found that there exists a temperature below which the chain appears to be in the lowest energy state (ground state). Both for random and proteinlike sequences and for regular copolymers with a relatively long repeating block, a molten globule regime is found between the ground state temperature and the transition temperature. For regular block copolymers the transition temperature increases with block size. Qualitatively, the results from both methods are in agreement. Differences between the methods result from approximations in the SCF theory and equilibration problems in MC simulations. The two methods are thus complementary.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)041708/1-041708/13
JournalPhysical Review. E, Statistical nonlinear, and soft matter physics
Volume65
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2002

Keywords

  • protein-like copolymers
  • finite chain-length
  • computer-simulation
  • phase-transitions
  • polymer-solutions
  • ab copolymers
  • macromolecules
  • collapse
  • heteropolymers
  • dimensions

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'Coil-globule transition for regular, random and specially designed copolymers: Monte Carlo simulation and self-consistent field theory'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this