CO2 in greenhouse horticulture

Marleen Esmeijer (Editor)

    Research output: Book/ReportReportProfessional

    Abstract

    Carbon dioxide dosing has become an integral part of greenhouse horticulture. Additional carbon dioxide or C02 promotes crop growth and increases production and/or improves quality. In 1995, approximately 80% of greenhouse horticulture businesses used C02 dosing. 50% of companies dose even in the absence of heat demand. Even though C02 dosing has been used for some time, there are still some unanswered questions around this technology. Some questions are new, the answer to others has become obscured over time. There is a great deal to be said about C02and C02 dosing. Since our previous brochure in 1988, there have been many new developments in the area of C02. This brochure explains all the latest advances in knowledge about C02and C02 dosing. Authors from a wide range of disciplines were involved in putting the brochure together. The information it contains will help you to make decisions on C02 and C02 dosing.
    Original languageEnglish
    Place of PublicationAalsmeer/Naaldwijk
    PublisherApplied Plant Reseach
    Number of pages117
    Publication statusPublished - 1999

    Fingerprint

    horticulture
    carbon dioxide
    greenhouses
    heat
    crops
    dosage

    Keywords

    • greenhouse horticulture
    • carbon monoxide
    • greenhouse technology
    • air conditioning
    • crop yield
    • emission reduction
    • postharvest quality
    • fertilizer application

    Cite this

    Esmeijer, M. (Ed.) (1999). CO2 in greenhouse horticulture. Aalsmeer/Naaldwijk: Applied Plant Reseach.
    Esmeijer, Marleen (Editor). / CO2 in greenhouse horticulture. Aalsmeer/Naaldwijk : Applied Plant Reseach, 1999. 117 p.
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    Esmeijer, M (ed.) 1999, CO2 in greenhouse horticulture. Applied Plant Reseach, Aalsmeer/Naaldwijk.

    CO2 in greenhouse horticulture. / Esmeijer, Marleen (Editor).

    Aalsmeer/Naaldwijk : Applied Plant Reseach, 1999. 117 p.

    Research output: Book/ReportReportProfessional

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    AB - Carbon dioxide dosing has become an integral part of greenhouse horticulture. Additional carbon dioxide or C02 promotes crop growth and increases production and/or improves quality. In 1995, approximately 80% of greenhouse horticulture businesses used C02 dosing. 50% of companies dose even in the absence of heat demand. Even though C02 dosing has been used for some time, there are still some unanswered questions around this technology. Some questions are new, the answer to others has become obscured over time. There is a great deal to be said about C02and C02 dosing. Since our previous brochure in 1988, there have been many new developments in the area of C02. This brochure explains all the latest advances in knowledge about C02and C02 dosing. Authors from a wide range of disciplines were involved in putting the brochure together. The information it contains will help you to make decisions on C02 and C02 dosing.

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    KW - kwaliteit na de oogst

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    Esmeijer M, (ed.). CO2 in greenhouse horticulture. Aalsmeer/Naaldwijk: Applied Plant Reseach, 1999. 117 p.