Close genetic proximity between cultivated and wild Bactris gasipaes Kunth. revealed by microsatellite markers in Western Ecuador.

T.L.P. Couvreur, N. Billotte, C. Lara, Y. Vigouroux, B. Ludena, J.L. Pham, J.C. Pintaud

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleAcademicpeer-review

20 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Bactris gasipaes Kunth (peach palm or Pejibaye) is the only domesticated palm of the Neotropics. The genetic relationships between the crop and its wild relatives are still unclear. We undertook field and laboratory work in order to describe differentiation and relationships between the wild and cultivated populations of the species in Western Ecuador, and their possible interactions. A volumetric study was undertaken on the fruits of both populations, as well as a population genetic analysis in order to clarify these relationships. Fruits from cultivated plants collected in the region of sympatry of wild and cultivated plants in North-West Ecuador showed intermediate volumes between those of reference samples for the wild and cultivated plants in allopatry. Using 8 microsatellite loci, we assessed 83 wild and cultivated individuals from Western Ecuador and cultivated plants from Amazonia and Central America as a reference for the cultivated form. We detected high polymorphism in the wild and cultivated samples and low, but significant level of genetic differentiation between wild and cultivated populations. The cultivated population in North-Western Ecuador showed close genetic proximity with the sympatric wild population, consistent with the volumetric study. These results have implications for hypotheses on evolution of this crop and for strategies of genetic conservation of the wild forms
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1361-1373
JournalGenetic Resources and Crop Evolution
Volume53
Issue number7
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2006

Keywords

  • palm
  • population
  • pejibaye
  • arecaceae
  • inference
  • heart

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