Climate conditions and spray treatments induce shifts in health promoting compounds in cherry (Prunus avium L.) fruits

Sofia Correia*, Alfredo Aires, Filipa Queirós, Rosa Carvalho, Rob Schouten, Ana Paula Silva, Berta Gonçalves

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleAcademicpeer-review

Abstract

Effects of repeated sprayings expected to affect phenolic, anthocyanin, carotenoid and ascorbic acid content in ‘Skeena’ and ‘Sweetheart’ cherries were observed during two years (without addition of calcium (Ca) in 2015, and with Ca in 2016). A shift in phytonutrients, with higher phenolic and carotenoid- and lower ascorbic acid content was observed when comparing Ca and the control (water) treatments in 2016 compared to 2015. Higher radiation, higher temperatures and less precipitation in 2015 compared to 2016 likely contributed to this shift. Gibberellic acid (GA3), abscisic acid (ABA), salicylic acid (SA) and glycine betaine (GB) sprays increased anthocyanin content in 2015 and for ‘Skeena’ cherries in 2016. GA3 and GB induced lower carotenoid content for ‘Skeena’- in 2015 and for ‘Sweetheart’ cherries in 2016 and lowered ascorbic acid content for ‘Sweetheart’ cherries. GA3 sprays induced the largest changes, increasing anthocyanin- (42 %), lowering carotenoid (19 %) and ascorbic acid content (53 %) compared to control. Ascophyllum nodosum, one of the novel spray treatments next to GB, appears to induce an effect opposite to GB, increasing carotenoid and ascorbic acid, but lowering phenolic content. Whether these phytonutrient shifts, due to climate conditions or to spray treatments, are beneficial to consumer health is unclear.

Original languageEnglish
Article number109147
JournalScientia Horticulturae
Volume263
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 15 Mar 2020

Fingerprint

health promotion
Prunus avium
betaine
carotenoids
ascorbic acid
climate
fruits
anthocyanins
calcium
Ascophyllum nodosum
water treatment
gibberellic acid
salicylic acid
spraying
abscisic acid
temperature

Keywords

  • Ascorbic acid
  • Calcium
  • Carotenoids
  • Growth regulators
  • Phenolic compounds
  • Sweet cherry

Cite this

Correia, Sofia ; Aires, Alfredo ; Queirós, Filipa ; Carvalho, Rosa ; Schouten, Rob ; Silva, Ana Paula ; Gonçalves, Berta. / Climate conditions and spray treatments induce shifts in health promoting compounds in cherry (Prunus avium L.) fruits. In: Scientia Horticulturae. 2020 ; Vol. 263.
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abstract = "Effects of repeated sprayings expected to affect phenolic, anthocyanin, carotenoid and ascorbic acid content in ‘Skeena’ and ‘Sweetheart’ cherries were observed during two years (without addition of calcium (Ca) in 2015, and with Ca in 2016). A shift in phytonutrients, with higher phenolic and carotenoid- and lower ascorbic acid content was observed when comparing Ca and the control (water) treatments in 2016 compared to 2015. Higher radiation, higher temperatures and less precipitation in 2015 compared to 2016 likely contributed to this shift. Gibberellic acid (GA3), abscisic acid (ABA), salicylic acid (SA) and glycine betaine (GB) sprays increased anthocyanin content in 2015 and for ‘Skeena’ cherries in 2016. GA3 and GB induced lower carotenoid content for ‘Skeena’- in 2015 and for ‘Sweetheart’ cherries in 2016 and lowered ascorbic acid content for ‘Sweetheart’ cherries. GA3 sprays induced the largest changes, increasing anthocyanin- (42 {\%}), lowering carotenoid (19 {\%}) and ascorbic acid content (53 {\%}) compared to control. Ascophyllum nodosum, one of the novel spray treatments next to GB, appears to induce an effect opposite to GB, increasing carotenoid and ascorbic acid, but lowering phenolic content. Whether these phytonutrient shifts, due to climate conditions or to spray treatments, are beneficial to consumer health is unclear.",
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Climate conditions and spray treatments induce shifts in health promoting compounds in cherry (Prunus avium L.) fruits. / Correia, Sofia; Aires, Alfredo; Queirós, Filipa; Carvalho, Rosa; Schouten, Rob; Silva, Ana Paula; Gonçalves, Berta.

In: Scientia Horticulturae, Vol. 263, 109147, 15.03.2020.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleAcademicpeer-review

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T1 - Climate conditions and spray treatments induce shifts in health promoting compounds in cherry (Prunus avium L.) fruits

AU - Correia, Sofia

AU - Aires, Alfredo

AU - Queirós, Filipa

AU - Carvalho, Rosa

AU - Schouten, Rob

AU - Silva, Ana Paula

AU - Gonçalves, Berta

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