Clean vector technology for marker-free transgenic ornamentals

F.A. Krens, K.T.B. Pelgrom, J.G. Schaart, A.P.M. den Nijs, G.J.A. Rouwendal

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleAcademicpeer-review

11 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Marker-free transgenic crops confer several advantages over transgenic crops equipped with e.g. genes coding for antibiotic resistance. Firstly, the European Union encourages notifiers for introductions of GMOs in the environment to ¿avoid or minimize the inclusion of superfluous transgenes or sequences¿ and it promotes the use of clean vector systems. Secondly, the number of selection genes allowing the preferential growth of transformed cells and tissues is limited and often a gene transfer protocol for a specific crop or even a cultivar depends on the use of one specific selectable marker gene. Hence, stacking of genes within the same transgenic line is difficult once a selectable marker gene has been introduced. If these marker genes can be removed, the subsequent introduction of the next gene-of-interest is greatly facilitated. At Plant Research International a system has been developed for specific elimination of any introduced DNA/gene sequences using site-specific recombination combined with selection for successful removal using a negative selection system. Completely marker-free transgenic plants have been obtained using a model vector, both in an efficient transformation system (strawberry) as well as in a non-efficient transformation system (apple). Frequencies were more than adequate. Presently. A versatile vector set providing a choice of several selectable markers and carrying a multiple cloning site for receiving cassettes of the gene-of-interest is available for application in, amongst others, ornamental crops
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)101-105
JournalActa Horticulturae
Volume651
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2004

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ornamental plants
genetically modified organisms
genes
genetic markers
crops
site-specific recombination
gene transfer
antibiotic resistance
European Union
strawberries
transgenes
molecular cloning
transgenic plants
cell growth
apples
nucleotide sequences
cultivars
DNA

Cite this

Krens, F.A. ; Pelgrom, K.T.B. ; Schaart, J.G. ; den Nijs, A.P.M. ; Rouwendal, G.J.A. / Clean vector technology for marker-free transgenic ornamentals. In: Acta Horticulturae. 2004 ; Vol. 651. pp. 101-105.
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abstract = "Marker-free transgenic crops confer several advantages over transgenic crops equipped with e.g. genes coding for antibiotic resistance. Firstly, the European Union encourages notifiers for introductions of GMOs in the environment to ¿avoid or minimize the inclusion of superfluous transgenes or sequences¿ and it promotes the use of clean vector systems. Secondly, the number of selection genes allowing the preferential growth of transformed cells and tissues is limited and often a gene transfer protocol for a specific crop or even a cultivar depends on the use of one specific selectable marker gene. Hence, stacking of genes within the same transgenic line is difficult once a selectable marker gene has been introduced. If these marker genes can be removed, the subsequent introduction of the next gene-of-interest is greatly facilitated. At Plant Research International a system has been developed for specific elimination of any introduced DNA/gene sequences using site-specific recombination combined with selection for successful removal using a negative selection system. Completely marker-free transgenic plants have been obtained using a model vector, both in an efficient transformation system (strawberry) as well as in a non-efficient transformation system (apple). Frequencies were more than adequate. Presently. A versatile vector set providing a choice of several selectable markers and carrying a multiple cloning site for receiving cassettes of the gene-of-interest is available for application in, amongst others, ornamental crops",
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Clean vector technology for marker-free transgenic ornamentals. / Krens, F.A.; Pelgrom, K.T.B.; Schaart, J.G.; den Nijs, A.P.M.; Rouwendal, G.J.A.

In: Acta Horticulturae, Vol. 651, 2004, p. 101-105.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleAcademicpeer-review

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AU - Krens, F.A.

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AU - Schaart, J.G.

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AU - Rouwendal, G.J.A.

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