Characterizing a scientific elite: the social characteristics of the most highly cited scientist in environmental science and ecology

J.N. Parker, C. Lortie, S. Allesina

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleAcademicpeer-review

39 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

In science, a relatively small pool of researchers garners a disproportionally large number of citations. Still, very little is known about the social characteristics of highly cited scientists. This is unfortunate as these researchers wield a disproportional impact on their fields, and the study of highly cited scientists can enhance our understanding of the conditions which foster highly cited work, the systematic social inequalities which exist in science, and scientific careers more generally. This study provides information on this understudied subject by examining the social characteristics and opinions of the 0.1% most cited environmental scientists and ecologists. Overall, the social characteristics of these researchers tend to reflect broader patterns of inequality in the global scientific community. However, while the social characteristics of these researchers mirror those of other scientific elites in important ways, they differ in others, revealing findings which are both novel and surprising, perhaps indicating multiple pathways to becoming highly cited.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)129-143
JournalScientometrics
Volume85
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2010
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • publication output
  • gender-differences
  • citation analysis
  • productivity
  • level
  • specialization
  • authors

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'Characterizing a scientific elite: the social characteristics of the most highly cited scientist in environmental science and ecology'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

  • Cite this