Characterisation of friction behaviour of intact soft solid foods and food boli

Philipp L. Fuhrmann, Monica Aguayo-Mendoza, Bas Jansen, Markus Stieger, Elke Scholten*

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleAcademicpeer-review

Abstract

Methodologies to quantify friction forces between soft solid foods or food boli and (model) oral surfaces are desired to better understand how changes in food properties during oral processing affect sensory perception. In this short communication, friction forces (FF) occurring between polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) surfaces and intact soft solid foods/boli were quantified. As models for intact foods, we used gelatine gels varying in composition and particle size, and sausages were used as an example for real foods. Friction forces measured during the relative motion of intact foods against a rough PDMS surface (“oral surface”), strongly depended on the composition of the food. Friction forces were significantly lower for PDMS against emulsion-filled gels, than for PDMS against unfilled gels, likely due to the lubricating effect of released oil from the gel. Moreover, sausages, displayed significantly higher friction forces than gelatine gels when moving against the PDMS probe, presumably linked to differences in the surface of the foods. The friction forces observed for the PDMS probe moving against food boli were dependent on particle size and saliva quantity; boli with larger particle sizes showed significantly lower friction forces, whereas the addition of saliva to food boli first increased friction forces, but with increasing amount decreased the friction forces significantly. We conclude that the presented methodology is able to quantify the friction behaviour of intact soft solid foods and boli directly, taking into account (i) the effect of composition and added fillers, (ii) serum or oil release and (iii) bolus particle size.

Original languageEnglish
Article number105441
JournalFood Hydrocolloids
Volume100
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Mar 2020

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Friction
friction
Food
Polydimethylsiloxane
gels
particle size
Particle Size
Gels
mouth
Particle size
saliva
sausages
gelatin
Saliva
Oils
Chemical analysis
oils
food composition
food quality
emulsions

Cite this

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title = "Characterisation of friction behaviour of intact soft solid foods and food boli",
abstract = "Methodologies to quantify friction forces between soft solid foods or food boli and (model) oral surfaces are desired to better understand how changes in food properties during oral processing affect sensory perception. In this short communication, friction forces (FF) occurring between polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) surfaces and intact soft solid foods/boli were quantified. As models for intact foods, we used gelatine gels varying in composition and particle size, and sausages were used as an example for real foods. Friction forces measured during the relative motion of intact foods against a rough PDMS surface (“oral surface”), strongly depended on the composition of the food. Friction forces were significantly lower for PDMS against emulsion-filled gels, than for PDMS against unfilled gels, likely due to the lubricating effect of released oil from the gel. Moreover, sausages, displayed significantly higher friction forces than gelatine gels when moving against the PDMS probe, presumably linked to differences in the surface of the foods. The friction forces observed for the PDMS probe moving against food boli were dependent on particle size and saliva quantity; boli with larger particle sizes showed significantly lower friction forces, whereas the addition of saliva to food boli first increased friction forces, but with increasing amount decreased the friction forces significantly. We conclude that the presented methodology is able to quantify the friction behaviour of intact soft solid foods and boli directly, taking into account (i) the effect of composition and added fillers, (ii) serum or oil release and (iii) bolus particle size.",
author = "Fuhrmann, {Philipp L.} and Monica Aguayo-Mendoza and Bas Jansen and Markus Stieger and Elke Scholten",
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Characterisation of friction behaviour of intact soft solid foods and food boli. / Fuhrmann, Philipp L.; Aguayo-Mendoza, Monica; Jansen, Bas; Stieger, Markus; Scholten, Elke.

In: Food Hydrocolloids, Vol. 100, 105441, 01.03.2020.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleAcademicpeer-review

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AU - Jansen, Bas

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AU - Scholten, Elke

PY - 2020/3/1

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AB - Methodologies to quantify friction forces between soft solid foods or food boli and (model) oral surfaces are desired to better understand how changes in food properties during oral processing affect sensory perception. In this short communication, friction forces (FF) occurring between polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) surfaces and intact soft solid foods/boli were quantified. As models for intact foods, we used gelatine gels varying in composition and particle size, and sausages were used as an example for real foods. Friction forces measured during the relative motion of intact foods against a rough PDMS surface (“oral surface”), strongly depended on the composition of the food. Friction forces were significantly lower for PDMS against emulsion-filled gels, than for PDMS against unfilled gels, likely due to the lubricating effect of released oil from the gel. Moreover, sausages, displayed significantly higher friction forces than gelatine gels when moving against the PDMS probe, presumably linked to differences in the surface of the foods. The friction forces observed for the PDMS probe moving against food boli were dependent on particle size and saliva quantity; boli with larger particle sizes showed significantly lower friction forces, whereas the addition of saliva to food boli first increased friction forces, but with increasing amount decreased the friction forces significantly. We conclude that the presented methodology is able to quantify the friction behaviour of intact soft solid foods and boli directly, taking into account (i) the effect of composition and added fillers, (ii) serum or oil release and (iii) bolus particle size.

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